"Agenda 2030" de la ONU

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  1. Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

    Preamble


    This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It also seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom. We recognise that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. All countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, will implement this plan. We are resolved to free the human race from the tyranny of poverty and want and to heal and secure our planet. We are determined to take the bold and transformative steps which are urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. As we embark on this collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets which we are announcing today demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal Agenda. They seek to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve. They seek to realize the human rights of all and to achieve gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls. They are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental.


    The Goals and targets will stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet:


    People


    We are determined to end poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, and to ensure that all human beings can fulfil their potential in dignity and equality and in a healthy environment.


    Planet


    We are determined to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production, sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change, so that it can support the needs of the present and future generations.


    Prosperity


    We are determined to ensure that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives and that economic, social and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature.


    Peace


    We are determined to foster peaceful, just and inclusive societies which are free from fear and violence. There can be no sustainable development without peace and no peace without sustainable development.


    Partnership


    We are determined to mobilize the means required to implement this Agenda through a revitalised Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, based on a spirit of strengthened global solidarity, focussed in particular on the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable and with the participation of all countries, all stakeholders and all people.


    The interlinkages and integrated nature of the Sustainable Development Goals are of crucial importance in ensuring that the purpose of the new Agenda is realised. If we realize our ambitions across the full extent of the Agenda, the lives of all will be profoundly improved and our world will be transformed for the better.


    DECLARATION


    Introduction


    1. We, the Heads of State and Government and High Representatives, meeting at the United Nations Headquarters in New York from 25-27 September 2015 as the Organization celebrates its seventieth anniversary, have decided today on new global Sustainable Development Goals.


    2. On behalf of the peoples we serve, we have adopted a historic decision on a comprehensive, far-reaching and people-centred set of universal and transformative Goals and targets. We commit ourselves to working tirelessly for the full implementation of this Agenda by 2030. We recognize that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. We are committed to achieving sustainable development in its three dimensions – economic, social and environmental – in a balanced and integrated manner. We will also build upon the achievements of the Millennium Development Goals and seek to address their unfinished business.


    3. We resolve, between now and 2030, to end poverty and hunger everywhere; to combat inequalities within and among countries; to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies; to protect human rights and promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; and to ensure the lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources. We resolve also to create conditions for sustainable, inclusive and sustained economic growth, shared prosperity and decent work for all, taking into account different levels of national development and capacities.


    4. As we embark on this great collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind. Recognizing that the dignity of the human person is fundamental, we wish to see the Goals and targets met for all nations and peoples and for all segments of society. And we will endeavour to reach the furthest behind first.


    5. This is an Agenda of unprecedented scope and significance. It is accepted by all countries and is applicable to all, taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and respecting national policies and priorities. These are universal goals and targets which involve the entire world, developed and developing countries alike. They are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development.


    6. The Goals and targets are the result of over two years of intensive public consultation and engagement with civil society and other stakeholders around the world, which paid particular attention to the voices of the poorest and most vulnerable. This consultation included valuable work done by the General Assembly Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals and by the United Nations, whose Secretary-General provided a synthesis report in December 2014.


    Our vision


    7. In these Goals and targets, we are setting out a supremely ambitious and transformational vision. We envisage a world free of poverty, hunger, disease and want, where all life can thrive. We envisage a world free of fear and violence. A world with universal literacy. A world with equitable and universal access to quality education at all levels, to health care and social protection, where physical, mental and social well-being are assured. A world where we reaffirm our commitments regarding the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation and where there is improved hygiene; and where food is sufficient, safe, affordable and nutritious. A world where human habitats are safe, resilient and sustainable and where there is universal access to affordable, reliable and sustainable energy.


    8. We envisage a world of universal respect for human rights and human dignity, the rule of law, justice, equality and non-discrimination; of respect for race, ethnicity and cultural diversity; and of equal opportunity permitting the full realization of human potential and contributing to shared prosperity. A world which invests in its children and in which every child grows up free from violence and exploitation. A world in which every woman and girl enjoys full gender equality and all legal, social and economic barriers to their empowerment have been removed. A just, equitable, tolerant, open and socially inclusive world in which the needs of the most vulnerable are met.


    9. We envisage a world in which every country enjoys sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and decent work for all. A world in which consumption and production patterns and use of all natural resources – from air to land, from rivers, lakes and aquifers to oceans and seas - are sustainable. One in which democracy, good governance and the rule of law as well as an enabling environment at national and international levels, are essential for sustainable development, including sustained and inclusive economic growth, social development, environmental protection and the eradication of poverty and hunger. One in which development and the application of technology are climate-sensitive, respect biodiversity and are resilient. One in which humanity lives in harmony with nature and in which wildlife and other living species are protected.


    Our shared principles and commitments


    10. The new Agenda is guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, including full respect for international law. It is grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international human rights treaties, the Millennium Declaration and the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document. It is informed by other instruments such as the Declaration on the Right to Development.


    11. We reaffirm the outcomes of all major UN conferences and summits which have laid a solid foundation for sustainable development and have helped to shape the new Agenda. These include the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development; the World Summit on Sustainable Development; the World Summit for Social Development; the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Beijing Platform for Action; and the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development ("Rio+ 20"). We also reaffirm the follow-up to these conferences, including the outcomes of the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries, the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States; the Second United Nations Conference on Landlocked Developing Countries; and the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction.


    12. We reaffirm all the principles of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, including, inter alia, the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, as set out in principle 7 thereof.


    13. The challenges and commitments contained in these major conferences and summits are interrelated and call for integrated solutions. To address them effectively, a new approach is needed. Sustainable development recognizes that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, combatting inequality within and among countries, preserving the planet, creating sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and fostering social inclusion are linked to each other and are interdependent.


    Our world today


    14. We are meeting at a time of immense challenges to sustainable development. Billions of our citizens continue to live in poverty and are denied a life of dignity. There are rising inequalities within and among countries. There are enormous disparities of opportunity, wealth and power. Gender inequality remains a key challenge. Unemployment, particularly youth unemployment, is a major concern. Global health threats, more frequent and intense natural disasters, spiralling conflict, violent extremism, terrorism and related humanitarian crises and forced displacement of people threaten to reverse much of the development progress made in recent decades. Natural resource depletion and adverse impacts of environmental degradation, including desertification, drought, land degradation, freshwater scarcity and loss of biodiversity, add to and exacerbate the list of challenges which humanity faces. Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time and its adverse impacts undermine the ability of all countries to achieve sustainable development. Increases in global temperature, sea level rise, ocean acidification and other climate change impacts are seriously affecting coastal areas and low-lying coastal countries, including many least developed countries and small island developing States. The survival of many societies, and of the biological support systems of the planet, is at risk.


    15. It is also, however, a time of immense opportunity. Significant progress has been made in meeting many development challenges. Within the past generation, hundreds of millions of people have emerged from extreme poverty. Access to education has greatly increased for both boys and girls. The spread of information and communications technology and global interconnectedness has great potential to accelerate human progress, to bridge the digital divide and to develop knowledge societies, as does scientific and technological innovation across areas as diverse as medicine and energy.


    16. Almost fifteen years ago, the Millennium Development Goals were agreed. These provided an important framework for development and significant progress has been made in a number of areas. But the progress has been uneven, particularly in Africa, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries, and small island developing States, and some of the MDGs remain off-track, in particular those related to maternal, newborn and child health and to reproductive health. We recommit ourselves to the full realization of all the MDGs, including the off-track MDGs, in particular by providing focussed and scaled-up assistance to least developed countries and other countries in special situations, in line with relevant support programmes. The new Agenda builds on the Millennium Development Goals and seeks to complete what these did not achieve, particularly in reaching the most vulnerable.


    17. In its scope, however, the framework we are announcing today goes far beyond the MDGs. Alongside continuing development priorities such as poverty eradication, health, education and food security and nutrition, it sets out a wide range of economic, social and environmental objectives. It also promises more peaceful and inclusive societies. It also, crucially, defines means of implementation. Reflecting the integrated approach that we have decided on, there are deep interconnections and many cross-cutting elements across the new Goals and targets.


    The new Agenda


    18. We are announcing today 17 Sustainable Development Goals with 169 associated targets which are integrated and indivisible. Never before have world leaders pledged common action and endeavour across such a broad and universal policy agenda. We are setting out together on the path towards sustainable development, devoting ourselves collectively to the pursuit of global development and of "win-win" cooperation which can bring huge gains to all countries and all parts of the world. We reaffirm that every State has, and shall freely exercise, full permanent sovereignty over all its wealth, natural resources and economic activity. We will implement the Agenda for the full benefit of all, for today’s generation and for future generations. In doing so, we reaffirm our commitment to international law and emphasize that the Agenda is to be implemented in a manner that is consistent with the rights and obligations of states under international law.


    19. We reaffirm the importance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as well as other international instruments relating to human rights and international law. We emphasize the responsibilities of all States, in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations, to respect, protect and promote human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction of any kind as to race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth, disability or other status.


    20. Realizing gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls will make a crucial contribution to progress across all the Goals and targets. The achievement of full human potential and of sustainable development is not possible if one half of humanity continues to be denied its full human rights and opportunities. Women and girls must enjoy equal access to quality education, economic resources and political participation as well as equal opportunities with men and boys for employment, leadership and decision-making at all levels. We will work for a significant increase in investments to close the gender gap and strengthen support for institutions in relation to gender equality and the empowerment of women at the global, regional and national levels. All forms of discrimination and violence against women and girls will be eliminated, including through the engagement of men and boys. The systematic mainstreaming of a gender perspective in the implementation of the Agenda is crucial.


    21. The new Goals and targets will come into effect on 1 January 2016 and will guide the decisions we take over the next fifteen years. All of us will work to implement the Agenda within our own countries and at the regional and global levels, taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and respecting national policies and priorities We will respect national policy space for sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, in particular for developing states, while remaining consistent with relevant international rules and commitments. We acknowledge also the importance of the regional and sub-regional dimensions, regional economic integration and interconnectivity in sustainable development. Regional and sub-regional frameworks can facilitate the effective translation of sustainable development policies into concrete action at national level.


    22. Each country faces specific challenges in its pursuit of sustainable development. The most vulnerable countries and, in particular, African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing states deserve special attention, as do countries in situations of conflict and post-conflict countries. There are also serious challenges within many middle-income countries.


    23. People who are vulnerable must be empowered. Those whose needs are reflected in the Agenda include all children, youth, persons with disabilities (of whom more than 80% live in poverty), people living with HIV/AIDS, older persons, indigenous peoples, refugees and internally displaced persons and migrants. We resolve to take further effective measures and actions, in conformity with international law, to remove obstacles and constraints, strengthen support and meet the special needs of people living in areas affected by complex humanitarian emergencies and in areas affected by terrorism.


    24. We are committed to ending poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including by eradicating extreme poverty by 2030. All people must enjoy a basic standard of living, including through social protection systems. We are also determined to end hunger and to achieve food security as a matter of priority and to end all forms of malnutrition. In this regard, we reaffirm the important role and inclusive nature of the Committee on World Food Security and welcome the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and Framework for Action. We will devote resources to developing rural areas and sustainable agriculture and fisheries, supporting smallholder farmers, especially women farmers, herders and fishers in developing countries, particularly least developed countries.


    25. We commit to providing inclusive and equitable quality education at all levels – early childhood, primary, secondary, tertiary, technical and vocational training. All people, irrespective of sex, age, race, ethnicity, and persons with disabilities, migrants, indigenous peoples, children and youth, especially those in vulnerable situations, should have access to life-long learning opportunities that help them acquire the knowledge and skills needed to exploit opportunities and to participate fully in society. We will strive to provide children and youth with a nurturing environment for the full realization of their rights and capabilities, helping our countries to reap the demographic dividend including through safe schools and cohesive communities and families.


    26. To promote physical and mental health and well-being, and to extend life expectancy for all, we must achieve universal health coverage and access to quality health care. No one must be left behind. We commit to accelerating the progress made to date in reducing newborn, child and maternal mortality by ending all such preventable deaths before 2030. We are committed to ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education. We will equally accelerate the pace of progress made in fighting malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, hepatitis, Ebola and other communicable diseases and epidemics, including by addressing growing anti-microbial resistance and the problem of unattended diseases affecting developing countries. We are committed to the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases, including behavioural, developmental and neurological disorders, which constitute a major challenge for sustainable development.


    27. We will seek to build strong economic foundations for all our countries. Sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth is essential for prosperity. This will only be possible if wealth is shared and income inequality is addressed. We will work to build dynamic, sustainable, innovative and people-centred economies, promoting youth employment and women’s economic empowerment, in particular, and decent work for all. We will eradicate forced labour and human trafficking and end child labour in all its forms. All countries stand to benefit from having a healthy and well-educated workforce with the knowledge and skills needed for productive and fulfilling work and full participation in society. We will strengthen the productive capacities of least-developed countries in all sectors, including through structural transformation. We will adopt policies which increase productive capacities, productivity and productive employment; financial inclusion; sustainable agriculture, pastoralist and fisheries development; sustainable industrial development; universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy services; sustainable transport systems; and quality and resilient infrastructure.


    28. We commit to making fundamental changes in the way that our societies produce and consume goods and services. Governments, international organizations, the business sector and other non-state actors and individuals must contribute to changing unsustainable consumption and production patterns, including through the mobilization, from all sources, of financial and technical assistance to strengthen developing countries’ scientific, technological and innovative capacities to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption and production. We encourage the implementation of the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production. All countries take action, with developed countries taking the lead, taking into account the development and capabilities of developing countries.


    29. We recognize the positive contribution of migrants for inclusive growth and sustainable development. We also recognize that international migration is a multi-dimensional reality of major relevance for the development of countries of origin, transit and destination, which requires coherent and comprehensive responses. We will cooperate internationally to ensure safe, orderly and regular migration involving full respect for human rights and the humane treatment of migrants regardless of migration status, of refugees and of displaced persons. Such cooperation should also strengthen the resilience of communities hosting refugees, particularly in developing countries. We underline the right of migrants to return to their country of citizenship, and recall that States must ensure that their returning nationals are duly received.


    30. States are strongly urged to refrain from promulgating and applying any unilateral economic, financial or trade measures not in accordance with international law and the Charter of the United Nations that impede the full achievement of economic and social development, particularly in developing countries.


    31. We acknowledge that the UNFCCC is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change. We are determined to address decisively the threat posed by climate change and environmental degradation. The global nature of climate change calls for the widest possible international cooperation aimed at accelerating the reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions and addressing adaptation to the adverse impacts of climate change. We note with grave concern the significant gap between the aggregate effect of Parties’ mitigation pledges in terms of global annual emissions of greenhouse gases by 2020 and aggregate emission pathways consistent with having a likely chance of holding the increase in global average temperature below 2 °C or 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels.


    32. Looking ahead to the COP21 conference in Paris in December, we underscore the commitment of all States to work for an ambitious and universal climate agreement. We reaffirm that the protocol, another legal instrument or agreed outcome with legal force under the Convention applicable to all Parties shall address in a balanced manner, inter alia, mitigation, adaptation, finance, technology development and transfer, and capacity-building, and transparency of action and support.


    33. We recognise that social and economic development depends on the sustainable management of our planet’s natural resources. We are therefore determined to conserve and sustainably use oceans and seas, freshwater resources, as well as forests, mountains and drylands and to protect biodiversity, ecosystems and wildlife. We are also determined to promote sustainable tourism, tackle water scarcity and water pollution, to strengthen cooperation on desertification, dust storms, land degradation and drought and to promote resilience and disaster risk reduction. In this regard, we look forward to COP13 of the Convention on Biological Diversity to be held in Mexico in 2016.


    34. We recognize that sustainable urban development and management are crucial to the quality of life of our people. We will work with local authorities and communities to renew and plan our cities and human settlements so as to foster community cohesion and personal security and to stimulate innovation and employment. We will reduce the negative impacts of urban activities and of chemicals which are hazardous for human health and the environment, including through the environmentally sound management and safe use of chemicals, the reduction and recycling of waste and more efficient use of water and energy. And we will work to minimize the impact of cities on the global climate system. We will also take account of population trends and projections in our national, rural and urban development strategies and policies. We look forward to the upcoming United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development in Quito, Ecuador.


    35. Sustainable development cannot be realized without peace and security; and peace and security will be at risk without sustainable development. The new Agenda recognizes the need to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies that provide equal access to justice and that are based on respect for human rights (including the right to development), on effective rule of law and good governance at all levels and on transparent, effective and accountable institutions. Factors which give rise to violence, insecurity and injustice, such as inequality, corruption, poor governance and illicit financial and arms flows, are addressed in the Agenda. We must redouble our efforts to resolve or prevent conflict and to support post-conflict countries, including through ensuring that women have a role in peace-building and state-building. We call for further effective measures and actions to be taken, in conformity with international law, to remove the obstacles to the full realization of the right of self-determination of peoples living under colonial and foreign occupation, which continue to adversely affect their economic and social development as well as their environment.


    36. We pledge to foster inter-cultural understanding, tolerance, mutual respect and an ethic of global citizenship and shared responsibility. We acknowledge the natural and cultural diversity of the world and recognize that all cultures and civilizations can contribute to, and are crucial enablers of, sustainable development.


    37. Sport is also an important enabler of sustainable development. We recognize the growing contribution of sport to the realization of development and peace in its promotion of tolerance and respect and the contributions it makes to the empowerment of women and of young people, individuals and communities as well as to health, education and social inclusion objectives.


    38. We reaffirm, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, the need to respect the territorial integrity and political independence of States.


    Means of Implementation


    39. The scale and ambition of the new Agenda requires a revitalized Global Partnership to ensure its implementation. We fully commit to this. This Partnership will work in a spirit of global solidarity, in particular solidarity with the poorest and with people in vulnerable situations. It will facilitate an intensive global engagement in support of implementation of all the Goals and targets, bringing together Governments, the private sector, civil society, the United Nations system and other actors and mobilizing all available resources.


    40. The means of implementation targets under Goal 17 and under each SDG are key to realising our Agenda and are of equal importance with the other Goals and targets. The Agenda, including the SDGs, can be met within the framework of a revitalized global partnership for sustainable development, supported by the concrete policies and actions as outlined in the outcome document of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development, held in Addis Ababa from 13-16 July 2015. We welcome the endorsement by the General Assembly of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, which is an integral part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. We recognize that the full implementation of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda is critical for the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals and targets.


    41. We recognize that each country has primary responsibility for its own economic and social development. The new Agenda deals with the means required for implementation of the Goals and targets. We recognize that these will include the mobilization of financial resources as well as capacity-building and the transfer of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed. Public finance, both domestic and international, will play a vital role in providing essential services and public goods and in catalyzing other sources of finance. We acknowledge the role of the diverse private sector, ranging from micro-enterprises to cooperatives to multinationals, and that of civil society organizations and philanthropic organizations in the implementation of the new Agenda.


    42. We support the implementation of relevant strategies and programmes of action, including the Istanbul Declaration and Programme of Action, the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway, the Vienna Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries for the Decade 2014-2024, and reaffirm the importance of supporting the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and the programme of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), all of which are integral to the new Agenda. We recognize the major challenge to the achievement of durable peace and sustainable development in countries in conflict and post-conflict situations.


    43. We emphasize that international public finance plays an important role in complementing the efforts of countries to mobilize public resources domestically, especially in the poorest and most vulnerable countries with limited domestic resources. An important use of international public finance, including ODA, is to catalyse additional resource mobilization from other sources, public and private. ODA providers reaffirm their respective commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7% of ODA/GNI to developing countries and 0.15% to 0.2% of ODA/GNI to least developed countries.


    44. We acknowledge the importance for international financial institutions to support, in line with their mandates, the policy space of each country, in particular developing countries. We recommit to broadening and strengthening the voice and participation of developing countries – including African countries, least developed countries, land-locked developing countries, small-island developing States and middle-income countries – in international economic decision-making, norm-setting and global economic governance.


    45. We acknowledge also the essential role of national parliaments through their enactment of legislation and adoption of budgets and their role in ensuring accountability for the effective implementation of our commitments. Governments and public institutions will also work closely on implementation with regional and local authorities, sub-regional institutions, international institutions, academia, philanthropic organisations, volunteer groups and others.


    46. We underline the important role and comparative advantage of an adequately resourced, relevant, coherent, efficient and effective UN system in supporting the achievement of the SDGs and sustainable development. While stressing the importance of strengthened national ownership and leadership at country level, we express our support for the ongoing ECOSOC Dialogue on the longer-term positioning of the United Nations development system in the context of this Agenda.


    Follow-up and review


    47. Our Governments have the primary responsibility for follow-up and review, at the national, regional and global levels, in relation to the progress made in implementing the Goals and targets over the coming fifteen years. To support accountability to our citizens, we will provide for systematic follow-up and review at the various levels, as set out in this Agenda and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. The High Level Political Forum under the auspices of the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council will have the central role in overseeing follow-up and review at the global level.


    48. Indicators are being developed to assist this work. Quality, accessible, timely and reliable disaggregated data will be needed to help with the measurement of progress and to ensure that no one is left behind. Such data is key to decision-making. Data and information from existing reporting mechanisms should be used where possible. We agree to intensify our efforts to strengthen statistical capacities in developing countries, particularly African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries, small island developing States and middle-income countries. We are committed to developing broader measures of progress to complement gross domestic product (GDP).


    A call for action to change our world


    49. Seventy years ago, an earlier generation of world leaders came together to create the United Nations. From the ashes of war and division they fashioned this Organization and the values of peace, dialogue and international cooperation which underpin it. The supreme embodiment of those values is the Charter of the United Nations.


    50. Today we are also taking a decision of great historic significance. We resolve to build a better future for all people, including the millions who have been denied the chance to lead decent, dignified and rewarding lives and to achieve their full human potential. We can be the first generation to succeed in ending poverty; just as we may be the last to have a chance of saving the planet. The world will be a better place in 2030 if we succeed in our objectives.


    51. What we are announcing today – an Agenda for global action for the next fifteen years – is a charter for people and planet in the twenty-first century. Children and young women and men are critical agents of change and will find in the new Goals a platform to channel their infinite capacities for activism into the creation of a better world.


    52. "We the Peoples" are the celebrated opening words of the UN Charter. It is "We the Peoples" who are embarking today on the road to 2030. Our journey will involve Governments as well as Parliaments, the UN system and other international institutions, local authorities, indigenous peoples, civil society, business and the private sector, the scientific and academic community – and all people. Millions have already engaged with, and will own, this Agenda. It is an Agenda of the people, by the people, and for the people – and this, we believe, will ensure its success.


    53. The future of humanity and of our planet lies in our hands. It lies also in the hands of today’s younger generation who will pass the torch to future generations. We have mapped the road to sustainable development; it will be for all of us to ensure that the journey is successful and its gains irreversible.


    Sustainable Development Goals and targets


    54. Following an inclusive process of intergovernmental negotiations, and based on the Proposal of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals , which includes a chapeau contextualising the latter, the following are the Goals and targets which we have agreed.


    55. The SDGs and targets are integrated and indivisible, global in nature and universally applicable, taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and respecting national policies and priorities. Targets are defined as aspirational and global, with each government setting its own national targets guided by the global level of ambition but taking into account national circumstances. Each government will also decide how these aspirational and global targets should be incorporated in national planning processes, policies and strategies. It is important to recognize the link between sustainable development and other relevant ongoing processes in the economic, social and environmental fields.


    56. In deciding upon these Goals and targets, we recognise that each country faces specific challenges to achieve sustainable development, and we underscore the special challenges facing the most vulnerable countries and, in particular, African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States, as well as the specific challenges facing the middle-income countries. Countries in situations of conflict also need special attention.


    57. We recognize that baseline data for several of the targets remain unavailable, and we call for increased support for strengthening data collection and capacity building in Member States, to develop national and global baselines where they do not yet exist. We commit to addressing this gap in data collection so as to better inform the measurement of progress, in particular for those targets below which do not have clear numerical targets.


    58. We encourage ongoing efforts by states in other fora to address key issues which pose potential challenges to the implementation of our Agenda; and we respect the independent mandates of those processes. We intend that the Agenda and its implementation would support, and be without prejudice to, those other processes and the decisions taken therein.


    59. We recognise that there are different approaches, visions, models and tools available to each country, in accordance with its national circumstances and priorities, to achieve sustainable development; and we reaffirm that planet Earth and its ecosystems are our common home and that ‘Mother Earth’ is a common expression in a number of countries and regions.


    Sustainable Development Goals
    • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
    • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    • Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
    • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
    • Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
    • Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
    • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*
    • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
    • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development


    * Acknowledging that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change.


    Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere


    1.1 By 2030, eradicate extreme poverty for all people everywhere, currently measured as people living on less than $1.25 a day

    1.2 By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions
    1.3 Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable
    1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
    1.5 By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters
    1.a Ensure significant mobilization of resources from a variety of sources, including through enhanced development cooperation, in order to provide adequate and predictable means for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, to implement programmes and policies to end poverty in all its dimensions
    1.b Create sound policy frameworks at the national, regional and international levels, based on pro-poor and gender-sensitive development strategies, to support accelerated investment in poverty eradication actions


    Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture


    2.1 By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round
    2.2 By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons
    2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment
    2.4 By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality
    2.5 By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed
    2.a Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries
    2.b Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets, including through the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round
    2.c Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility


    Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages


    3.1 By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births
    3.2 By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births and under-5 mortality to at least as low as 25 per 1,000 live births
    3.3 By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases
    3.4 By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being
    3.5 Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol
    3.6 By 2020, halve the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents
    3.7 By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes
    3.8 Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all
    3.9 By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination
    3.a Strengthen the implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in all countries, as appropriate
    3.b Support the research and development of vaccines and medicines for the communicable and non-communicable diseases that primarily affect developing countries, provide access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines, in accordance with the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health, which affirms the right of developing countries to use to the full the provisions in the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights regarding flexibilities to protect public health, and, in particular, provide access to medicines for all
    3.c Substantially increase health financing and the recruitment, development, training and retention of the health workforce in developing countries, especially in least developed countries and small island developing States
    3.d Strengthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks


    Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all


    4.1 By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes
    4.2 By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and pre-primary education so that they are ready for primary education
    4.3 By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university
    4.4 By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship
    4.5 By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations
    4.6 By 2030, ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy
    4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development
    4.a Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all
    4.b By 2020, substantially expand globally the number of scholarships available to developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States and African countries, for enrolment in higher education, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, in developed countries and other developing countries
    4.c By 2030, substantially increase the supply of qualified teachers, including through international cooperation for teacher training in developing countries, especially least developed countries and small island developing States


    Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls


    5.1 End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere
    5.2 Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation
    5.3 Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation
    5.4 Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate
    5.5 Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life
    5.6 Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences
    5.a Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws
    5.b Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women
    5.c Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels


    Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all


    6.1 By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all
    6.2 By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations
    6.3 By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally
    6.4 By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity
    6.5 By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate
    6.6 By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes
    6.a By 2030, expand international cooperation and capacity-building support to developing countries in water- and sanitation-related activities and programmes, including water harvesting, desalination, water efficiency, wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse technologies
    6.b Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management


    Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all


    7.1 By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
    7.2 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix
    7.3 By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency
    7.a By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology
    7.b By 2030, expand infrastructure and upgrade technology for supplying modern and sustainable energy services for all in developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States, and land-locked developing countries, in accordance with their respective programmes of support


    Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all


    8.1 Sustain per capita economic growth in accordance with national circumstances and, in particular, at least 7 per cent gross domestic product growth per annum in the least developed countries
    8.2 Achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors
    8.3 Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage the formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial services
    8.4 Improve progressively, through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, with developed countries taking the lead
    8.5 By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value
    8.6 By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training
    8.7 Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms
    8.8 Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment
    8.9 By 2030, devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products
    8.10 Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance and financial services for all
    8.a Increase Aid for Trade support for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, including through the Enhanced Integrated Framework for Trade-Related Technical Assistance to Least Developed Countries
    8.b By 2020, develop and operationalize a global strategy for youth employment and implement the Global Jobs Pact of the International Labour Organization


    Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation


    9.1 Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all
    9.2 Promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and, by 2030, significantly raise industry’s share of employment and gross domestic product, in line with national circumstances, and double its share in least developed countries
    9.3 Increase the access of small-scale industrial and other enterprises, in particular in developing countries, to financial services, including affordable credit, and their integration into value chains and markets
    9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities
    9.5 Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending
    9.a Facilitate sustainable and resilient infrastructure development in developing countries through enhanced financial, technological and technical support to African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States
    9.b Support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries, including by ensuring a conducive policy environment for, inter alia, industrial diversification and value addition to commodities
    9.c Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020


    Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries


    10.1 By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average
    10.2 By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status
    10.3 Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard
    10.4 Adopt policies, especially fiscal, wage and social protection policies, and progressively achieve greater equality
    10.5 Improve the regulation and monitoring of global financial markets and institutions and strengthen the implementation of such regulations
    10.6 Ensure enhanced representation and voice for developing countries in decision-making in global international economic and financial institutions in order to deliver more effective, credible, accountable and legitimate institutions
    10.7 Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies
    10.a Implement the principle of special and differential treatment for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, in accordance with World Trade Organization agreements
    10.b Encourage official development assistance and financial flows, including foreign direct investment, to States where the need is greatest, in particular least developed countries, African countries, small island developing States and landlocked developing countries, in accordance with their national plans and programmes
    10.c By 2030, reduce to less than 3 per cent the transaction costs of migrant remittances and eliminate remittance corridors with costs higher than 5 per cent


    Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable


    11.1 By 2030, ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums
    11.2 By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons
    11.3 By 2030, enhance inclusive and sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management in all countries
    11.4 Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage
    11.5 By 2030, significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected and substantially decrease the direct economic losses relative to global gross domestic product caused by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations
    11.6 By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management
    11.7 By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities
    11.a Support positive economic, social and environmental links between urban, peri-urban and rural areas by strengthening national and regional development planning
    11.b By 2020, substantially increase the number of cities and human settlements adopting and implementing integrated policies and plans towards inclusion, resource efficiency, mitigation and adaptation to climate change, resilience to disasters, and develop and implement, in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, holistic disaster risk management at all levels
    11.c Support least developed countries, including through financial and technical assistance, in building sustainable and resilient buildings utilizing local materials


    Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns


    12.1 Implement the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, all countries taking action, with developed countries taking the lead, taking into account the development and capabilities of developing countries
    12.2 By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources
    12.3 By 2030, halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses
    12.4 By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment
    12.5 By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse
    12.6 Encourage companies, especially large and transnational companies, to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle
    12.7 Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities
    12.8 By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature
    12.a Support developing countries to strengthen their scientific and technological capacity to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption and production
    12.b Develop and implement tools to monitor sustainable development impacts for sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products
    12.c Rationalize inefficient fossil-fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption by removing market distortions, in accordance with national circumstances, including by restructuring taxation and phasing out those harmful subsidies, where they exist, to reflect their environmental impacts, taking fully into account the specific needs and conditions of developing countries and minimizing the possible adverse impacts on their development in a manner that protects the poor and the affected communities


    Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*


    13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
    13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
    13.3 Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning
    13.a Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible
    13.b Promote mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in least developed countries and small island developing States, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities


    * Acknowledging that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change.


    Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development


    14.1 By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution
    14.2 By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans
    14.3 Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels
    14.4 By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics
    14.5 By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information
    14.6 By 2020, prohibit certain forms of fisheries subsidies which contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, eliminate subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and refrain from introducing new such subsidies, recognizing that appropriate and effective special and differential treatment for developing and least developed countries should be an integral part of the World Trade Organization fisheries subsidies negotiation
    14.7 By 2030, increase the economic benefits to Small Island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism
    14.a Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries
    14.b Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets
    14.c Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in UNCLOS, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of The Future We Want


    Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss


    15.1 By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements
    15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally
    15.3 By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world
    15.4 By 2030, ensure the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity, in order to enhance their capacity to provide benefits that are essential for sustainable development
    15.5 Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species
    15.6 Promote fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and promote appropriate access to such resources, as internationally agreed
    15.7 Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products
    15.8 By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species
    15.9 By 2020, integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into national and local planning, development processes, poverty reduction strategies and accounts
    15.a Mobilize and significantly increase financial resources from all sources to conserve and sustainably use biodiversity and ecosystems
    15.b Mobilize significant resources from all sources and at all levels to finance sustainable forest management and provide adequate incentives to developing countries to advance such management, including for conservation and reforestation
    15.c Enhance global support for efforts to combat poaching and trafficking of protected species, including by increasing the capacity of local communities to pursue sustainable livelihood opportunities


    Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels


    16.1 Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere
    16.2 End abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children
    16.3 Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all
    16.4 By 2030, significantly reduce illicit financial and arms flows, strengthen the recovery and return of stolen assets and combat all forms of organized crime
    16.5 Substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms
    16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
    16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
    16.8 Broaden and strengthen the participation of developing countries in the institutions of global governance
    16.9 By 2030, provide legal identity for all, including birth registration
    16.10 Ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms, in accordance with national legislation and international agreements
    16.a Strengthen relevant national institutions, including through international cooperation, for building capacity at all levels, in particular in developing countries, to prevent violence and combat terrorism and crime
    16.b Promote and enforce non-discriminatory laws and policies for sustainable development


    Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development


    Finance


    17.1 Strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection
    17.2 Developed countries to implement fully their official development assistance commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of ODA/GNI to developing countries and 0.15 to 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries; ODA providers are encouraged to consider setting a target to provide at least 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries
    17.3 Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources
    17.4 Assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief and debt restructuring, as appropriate, and address the external debt of highly indebted poor countries to reduce debt distress
    17.5 Adopt and implement investment promotion regimes for least developed countries


    Technology


    17.6 Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge sharing on mutually agreed terms, including through improved coordination among existing mechanisms, in particular at the United Nations level, and through a global technology facilitation mechanism
    17.7 Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed
    17.8 Fully operationalize the technology bank and science, technology and innovation capacity-building mechanism for least developed countries by 2017 and enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology


    Capacity-building


    17.9 Enhance international support for implementing effective and targeted capacity-building in developing countries to support national plans to implement all the sustainable development goals, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation


    Trade


    17.10 Promote a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization, including through the conclusion of negotiations under its Doha Development Agenda
    17.11 Significantly increase the exports of developing countries, in particular with a view to doubling the least developed countries’ share of global exports by 2020
    17.12 Realize timely implementation of duty-free and quota-free market access on a lasting basis for all least developed countries, consistent with World Trade Organization decisions, including by ensuring that preferential rules of origin applicable to imports from least developed countries are transparent and simple, and contribute to facilitating market access


    Systemic issues


    Policy and institutional coherence


    17.13 Enhance global macroeconomic stability, including through policy coordination and policy coherence
    17.14 Enhance policy coherence for sustainable development
    17.15 Respect each country’s policy space and leadership to establish and implement policies for poverty eradication and sustainable development


    Multi-stakeholder partnerships


    17.16 Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries
    17.17 Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships


    Data, monitoring and accountability


    17.18 By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing countries, including for least developed countries and small island developing States, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts
    17.19 By 2030, build on existing initiatives to develop measurements of progress on sustainable development that complement gross domestic product, and support statistical capacity-building in developing countries


    Means of implementation and the Global Partnership


    60. We reaffirm our strong commitment to the full implementation of this new Agenda. We recognize that we will not be able to achieve our ambitious Goals and targets without a revitalized and enhanced Global Partnership and comparably ambitious means of implementation. The revitalized Global Partnership will facilitate an intensive global engagement in support of implementation of all the goals and targets, bringing together Governments, civil society, the private sector, the United Nations system and other actors and mobilizing all available resources.


    61. The Agenda’s Goals and targets deal with the means required to realise our collective ambitions. The means of implementation targets under each SDG and Goal 17, which are referred to above, are key to realising our Agenda and are of equal importance with the other Goals and targets. We shall accord them equal priority in our implementation efforts and in the global indicator framework for monitoring our progress.


    62. This Agenda, including the SDGs, can be met within the framework of a revitalized global partnership for sustainable development, supported by the concrete policies and actions outlined in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda , which is an integral part of the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development. The Addis Ababa Action Agenda supports, complements and helps contextualize the 2030 Agenda’s means of implementation targets. These relate to domestic public resources, domestic and international private business and finance, international development cooperation, international trade as an engine for development, debt and debt sustainability, addressing systemic issues and science, technology, innovation and capacity-building, and data, monitoring and follow-up.


    63. Cohesive nationally owned sustainable development strategies, supported by integrated national financing frameworks, will be at the heart of our efforts. We reiterate that each country has primary responsibility for its own economic and social development and that the role of national policies and development strategies cannot be overemphasized. We will respect each country’s policy space and leadership to implement policies for poverty eradication and sustainable development, while remaining consistent with relevant international rules and commitments. At the same time, national development efforts need to be supported by an enabling international economic environment, including coherent and mutually supporting world trade, monetary and financial systems, and strengthened and enhanced global economic governance. Processes to develop and facilitate the availability of appropriate knowledge and technologies globally, as well as capacity-building, are also critical. We commit to pursuing policy coherence and an enabling environment for sustainable development at all levels and by all actors, and to reinvigorating the global partnership for sustainable development.


    64. We support the implementation of relevant strategies and programmes of action, including the Istanbul Declaration and Programme of Action, the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway, the Vienna Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries for the Decade 2014-2024, and reaffirm the importance of supporting the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and the programme of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), all of which are integral to the new Agenda. We recognize the major challenge to the achievement of durable peace and sustainable development in countries in conflict and post-conflict situations.


    65. We recognize that middle-income countries still face significant challenges to achieve sustainable development. In order to ensure that achievements made to date are sustained, efforts to address ongoing challenges should be strengthened through the exchange of experiences, improved coordination, and better and focused support of the United Nations Development System, the international financial institutions, regional organizations and other stakeholders.


    66. We underscore that, for all countries, public policies and the mobilization and effective use of domestic resources, underscored by the principle of national ownership, are central to our common pursuit of sustainable development, including achieving the sustainable development goals. We recognize that domestic resources are first and foremost generated by economic growth, supported by an enabling environment at all levels.


    67. Private business activity, investment and innovation are major drivers of productivity, inclusive economic growth and job creation. We acknowledge the diversity of the private sector, ranging from micro-enterprises to cooperatives to multinationals. We call on all businesses to apply their creativity and innovation to solving sustainable development challenges. We will foster a dynamic and well-functioning business sector, while protecting labour rights and environmental and health standards in accordance with relevant international standards and agreements and other on-going initiatives in this regard, such as the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the labour standards of ILO, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and key multilateral environmental agreements, for parties to those agreements.


    68. International trade is an engine for inclusive economic growth and poverty reduction, and contributes to the promotion of sustainable development. We will continue to promote a universal, rules-based, open, transparent, predictable, inclusive, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as meaningful trade liberalization. We call on all WTO members to redouble their efforts to promptly conclude the negotiations on the Doha Development Agenda. We attach great importance to providing trade-related capacity-building for developing countries, including African countries, least-developed countries, landlocked developing countries, small island developing states and middle-income countries, including for the promotion of regional economic integration and interconnectivity.


    69. We recognize the need to assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief, debt restructuring and sound debt management, as appropriate. Many countries remain vulnerable to debt crises and some are in the midst of crises, including a number of least developed countries, small-island developing States and some developed countries. We reiterate that debtors and creditors must work together to prevent and resolve unsustainable debt situations. Maintaining sustainable debt levels is the responsibility of the borrowing countries; however we acknowledge that lenders also have a responsibility to lend in a way that does not undermine a country’s debt sustainability. We will support the maintenance of debt sustainability of those countries that have received debt relief and achieved sustainable debt levels.


    70. We hereby launch a Technology Facilitation Mechanism which was established by the Addis Ababa Action Agenda in order to support the sustainable development goals. The Technology Facilitation Mechanism will be based on a multi-stakeholder collaboration between Member States, civil society, private sector, scientific community, United Nations entities and other stakeholders and will be composed of: a United Nations Interagency Task Team on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs, a collaborative Multistakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs and an on-line platform.


    • The United Nations Interagency Task Team on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs will promote coordination, coherence, and cooperation within the UN System on STI related matters, enhancing synergy and efficiency, in particular to enhance capacity-building initiatives. The Task Team will draw on existing resources and will work with 10 representatives from the civil society, private sector, the scientific community, to prepare the meetings of the Multistakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs, as well as in the development and operationalization of the on-line platform, including preparing proposals for the modalities for the Forum and the on-line platform. The 10 representatives will be appointed by the Secretary General, for periods of two years. The Task Team will be open to the participation of all UN agencies, funds and programmes, and ECOSOC functional commissions and it will initially be composed by the entities that currently integrate the informal working group on technology facilitation, namely: UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations Environment Programme, UNIDO, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNCTAD, International Telecommunication Union, WIPO and the World Bank.
    • The on-line platform will be used to establish a comprehensive mapping of, and serve as a gateway for, information on existing STI initiatives, mechanisms and programmes, within and beyond the UN. The on-line platform will facilitate access to information, knowledge and experience, as well as best practices and lessons learned, on STI facilitation initiatives and policies. The online platform will also facilitate the dissemination of relevant open access scientific publications generated worldwide. The on-line platform will be developed on the basis of an independent technical assessment which will take into account best practices and lessons learned from other initiatives, within and beyond the United Nations, in order to ensure that it will complement, facilitate access to and provide adequate information on existing STI platforms, avoiding duplications and enhancing synergies.
    • The Multi-stakeholder Forum on Science Technology and Innovation for the SDGs will be convened once a year, for a period of two days, to discuss STI cooperation around thematic areas for the implementation of the SDGs, congregating all relevant stakeholders to actively contribute in their area of expertise. The Forum will provide a venue for facilitating interaction, matchmaking and the establishment of networks between relevant stakeholders and multi- stakeholder partnerships in order to identify and examine technology needs and gaps, including on scientific cooperation, innovation and capacity building, and also in order to help facilitate development, transfer and dissemination of relevant technologies for the SDGs. The meetings of the Forum will be convened by the President of the ECOSOC before the meeting of the High Level Political Forum under the auspices of ECOSOC or, alternatively, in conjunction with other fora or conferences, as appropriate, taking into account the theme to be considered and on the basis of a collaboration with the organizers of the other fora or conference. The meetings of the Forum will be co-chaired by two Member States and will result in a summary of discussions elaborated by the two co-chairs, as an input to the meetings of the High Level Political Forum, in the context of the follow-up and review of the implementation of the Post-2015 Development Agenda.
    • The meetings of the HLPF will be informed by the summary of the Multistakeholder Forum. The themes for the subsequent Multistakeholder Forum on Science Technology and Innovation for the SDGs will be considered by the High Level Political Forum on sustainable development, taking into account expert inputs from the Task Team.


    71. We reiterate that this Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals and targets, including the means of implementation are universal, indivisible and interlinked.


    Follow-up and review


    72. We commit to engage in systematic follow-up and review of implementation of this Agenda over the next fifteen years. A robust, voluntary, effective, participatory, transparent and integrated follow-up and review framework will make a vital contribution to implementation and will help countries to maximize and track progress in implementing this Agenda in order to ensure that no one is left behind.


    73. Operating at the national, regional and global levels, it will promote accountability to our citizens, support effective international cooperation in achieving this Agenda and foster exchanges of best practices and mutual learning. It will mobilize support to overcome shared challenges and identify new and emerging issues. As this is a universal Agenda, mutual trust and understanding among all nations will be important.


    74. Follow-up and review processes at all levels will be guided by the following principles:


    a. They will be voluntary and country-led, will take into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and will respect policy space and priorities. As national ownership is key to achieving sustainable development, the outcome from national level processes will be the foundation for reviews at regional and global levels, given that the global review will be primarily based on national official data sources.
    b. They will track progress in implementing the universal Goals and targets, including the means of implementation, in all countries in a manner which respects their universal, integrated and interrelated nature and the three dimensions of sustainable development.
    c. They will maintain a longer-term orientation, identify achievements, challenges, gaps and critical success factors and support countries in making informed policy choices. They will help mobilize the necessary means of implementation and partnerships, support the identification of solutions and best practices and promote coordination and effectiveness of the international development system.
    d. They will be open, inclusive, participatory and transparent for all people and will support the reporting by all relevant stakeholders.
    e. They will be people-centred, gender-sensitive, respect human rights and have a particular focus on the poorest, most vulnerable and those furthest behind.
    f. They will build on existing platforms and processes, where these exist, avoid duplication and respond to national circumstances, capacities, needs and priorities. They will evolve over time, taking into account emerging issues and the development of new methodologies, and will minimize the reporting burden on national administrations.
    g. They will be rigorous and based on evidence, informed by country-led evaluations and data which is high-quality, accessible, timely, reliable and disaggregated by income, sex, age, race, ethnicity, migration status, disability and geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts.
    h. They will require enhanced capacity-building support for developing countries, including the strengthening of national data systems and evaluation programs, particularly in African countries, LDCs, SIDS and LLDCs and middle-income countries.
    i. They will benefit from the active support of the UN system and other multilateral institutions.


    75. The Goals and targets will be followed-up and reviewed using a set of global indicators. These will be complemented by indicators at the regional and national levels which will be developed by member states, in addition to the outcomes of work undertaken for the development of the baselines for those targets where national and global baseline data does not yet exist. The global indicator framework, to be developed by the Inter Agency and Expert Group on SDG Indicators, will be agreed by the UN Statistical Commission by March 2016 and adopted thereafter by the Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly, in line with existing mandates. This framework will be simple yet robust, address all SDGs and targets including for means of implementation, and preserve the political balance, integration and ambition contained therein.


    76. We will support developing countries, particularly African countries, LDCs, SIDS and LLDCs, in strengthening the capacity of national statistical offices and data systems to ensure access to high-quality, timely, reliable and disaggregated data. We will promote transparent and accountable scaling-up of appropriate public-private cooperation to exploit the contribution to be made by a wide range of data, including earth observation and geo-spatial information, while ensuring national ownership in supporting and tracking progress.


    77. We commit to fully engage in conducting regular and inclusive reviews of progress at sub-national, national, regional and global levels. We will draw as far as possible on the existing network of follow-up and review institutions and mechanisms. National reports will allow assessments of progress and identify challenges at the regional and global level. Along with regional dialogues and global reviews, they will inform recommendations for follow-up at various levels.


    National level


    78. We encourage all member states to develop as soon as practicable ambitious national responses to the overall implementation of this Agenda. These can support the transition to the SDGs and build on existing planning instruments, such as national development and sustainable development strategies, as appropriate.


    79. We also encourage member states to conduct regular and inclusive reviews of progress at the national and sub-national levels which are country-led and country-driven. Such reviews should draw on contributions from indigenous peoples, civil society, the private sector and other stakeholders, in line with national circumstances, policies and priorities. National parliaments as well as other institutions can also support these processes.


    Regional level


    80. Follow-up and review at the regional and sub-regional levels can, as appropriate, provide useful opportunities for peer learning, including through voluntary reviews, sharing of best practices and discussion on shared targets. We welcome in this respect the cooperation of regional and sub-regional commissions and organizations. Inclusive regional processes will draw on national-level reviews and contribute to follow-up and review at the global level, including at the High Level Political Forum on sustainable development (HLPF).


    81. Recognizing the importance of building on existing follow-up and review mechanisms at the regional level and allowing adequate policy space, we encourage all member states to identify the most suitable regional forum in which to engage. UN regional commissions are encouraged to continue supporting member states in this regard.


    Global level


    82. The HLPF will have a central role in overseeing a network of follow-up and review processes at the global level, working coherently with the General Assembly, ECOSOC and other relevant organs and forums, in accordance with existing mandates. It will facilitate sharing of experiences, including successes, challenges and lessons learned, and provide political leadership, guidance and recommendations for follow-up. It will promote system-wide coherence and coordination of sustainable development policies. It should ensure that the Agenda remains relevant and ambitious and should focus on the assessment of progress, achievements and challenges faced by developed and developing countries as well as new and emerging issues. Effective linkages will be made with the follow-up and review arrangements of all relevant UN Conferences and processes, including on LDCs, SIDS and LLDCs.


    83. Follow-up and review at the HLPF will be informed by an annual SDG Progress Report to be prepared by the Secretary General in cooperation with the UN System, based on the global indicator framework and data produced by national statistical systems and information collected at the regional level. The HLPF will also be informed by the Global Sustainable Development Report, which shall strengthen the science-policy interface and could provide a strong evidence-based instrument to support policy-makers in promoting poverty eradication and sustainable development. We invite the President of ECOSOC to conduct a process of consultations on the scope, methodology and frequency of the Report as well as its relation to the SDG Progress Report, the outcome of which should be reflected in the Ministerial Declaration of the HLPF session in 2016.


    84. The HLPF, under the auspices of ECOSOC, shall carry out regular reviews, in line with Resolution 67/290. Reviews will be voluntary, while encouraging reporting, and include developed and developing countries as well as relevant UN entities and other stakeholders, including civil society and the private sector. They shall be state-led, involving ministerial and other relevant high-level participants. They shall provide a platform for partnerships, including through the participation of major groups and other relevant stakeholders.


    85. Thematic reviews of progress on the Sustainable Development Goals, including cross-cutting issues, will also take place at the HLPF. These will be supported by reviews by the ECOSOC functional commissions and other inter-governmental bodies and forums which should reflect the integrated nature of the goals as well as the interlinkages between them. They will engage all relevant stakeholders and, where possible, feed into, and be aligned with, the cycle of the HLPF.


    86. We welcome, as outlined in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, the dedicated follow-up and review for the Financing for Development outcomes as well as all the means of implementation of the SDGs which is integrated with the follow-up and review framework of this Agenda. The intergovernmentally agreed conclusions and recommendations of the annual ECOSOC Forum on Financing for Development will be fed into the overall follow-up and review of the implementation of this Agenda in the HLPF.


    87. Meeting every four years under the auspices of the General Assembly, the HLPF will provide high-level political guidance on the Agenda and its implementation, identify progress and emerging challenges and mobilize further actions to accelerate implementation. The next HLPF, under the auspices of the General Assembly, will take place in 2019, with the cycle of meetings thus reset, in order to maximize coherence with the Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review process.


    88. We also stress the importance of system-wide strategic planning, implementation and reporting in order to ensure coherent and integrated support to implementation of the new Agenda by the UN development system. The relevant governing bodies should take action to review such support to implementation and to report on progress and obstacles. We welcome the ongoing ECOSOC Dialogues on the longer term positioning of the UN development system and look forward to taking action on these issues, as appropriate.


    89. The HLPF will support participation in follow-up and review processes by the major groups and other relevant stakeholders in line with Resolution 67/290. We call on these actors to report on their contribution to the implementation of the Agenda.


    90. We request the Secretary General, in consultation with Member States, to prepare a report, for consideration at the 70th session of the General Assembly in preparation for the 2016 meeting of the HLPF, which outlines critical milestones towards coherent efficient, and inclusive follow-up and review at the global level. This report should include a proposal on the organizational arrangements for state-led reviews at the HLPF under the auspices of ECOSOC, including recommendations on a voluntary common reporting guidelines. It should clarify institutional responsibilities and provide guidance on annual themes, on a sequence of thematic reviews, and on options for periodic reviews for the HLPF.


    91. We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to achieving this Agenda and utilizing it to the full to transform our world for the better by 2030.

    UNITED NATIONS
 
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El Gobierno Mundial que está gestando la ONU para Cambiar la Moral del Mundo

La reingeniería esta avanzando rápidamente.
La ONU está operando un plan maestro de 15 años, de aquí al 2030.
En el que no menciona a la familia como base de la sociedad.
Y cuando lo hace, ‘de costado’, es para justificar el ‘matrimonio homosexual’.
Pero hace un énfasis fuerte en la creación de un gobierno mundial.
Cuyo objetivo es una reingeniería de la moral cristiana en la sociedad.

Esto no lo encontrarás dicho explícitamente en los documentos sino en la jerga de la burocracia internacional.
.
Que traducimos en este artículo para que lo puedas comprender.
El Nuevo Orden Mundial utiliza a la ONU y a las organizaciones multilaterales como punta de lanza política que introduce su programa mundial.

Que a grandes rasgos está anclado en 4 agendas:

–agenda de población (que introduce el control de la población y su reducción);

–agenda de salud reproductiva (que contempla la anticoncepción, el aborto y la esterilización);

–agenda homosexual (que indirectamente apoya al control de la reproducción); y

–agenda ecológica (en que maneja el concepto de desarrollo sustentable, el calentamiento global y la gobernanza mundial ecológica).

Lamentablemente a los cristianos nos cuesta comprender que
.
-la promoción de la hipersexualización llevada adelante por los medios de comunicación,
.
-la ideología de género que entra en la clase de nuestros hijos,
.
-la presión para distribuir recetas a nuestras chicas de la píldora del día después o el aborto,
.
-los planteos de algunos cardenales y obispos para dar la bienvenida a la homosexualidad dentro de la Iglesia,
.
-la marcha hacia un gobierno mundial, y
.
-las acciones para bajar la cantidad de personas en el planeta,
.
son hechos relacionados y obedecen a un mismo plan maestro.
Veremos a continuación que hay una planificación central. Esto no es una “teoría de la conspiración”, esto esta pasando ahora.

Leer también:

LUEGO DE LA AGENDA DE LAS NACIONES UNIDAS DE EL CAIRO
En 2014 concluyó el plan de veinte años del programa establecido en El Cairo en 1994, sobre los “derechos de salud sexual y reproductiva”.

Entre estos derechos había algunos buenos, como el acceso a la medicina contra el SIDA o la promoción de la lactancia materna.

Pero había otros profundamente transgresores de la moral mundial hasta ese momento, como la anticoncepción, la esterilización, el aborto y la inclusión de los “nuevos derechos” LGBT.

De acuerdo con la ONU los objetivos de El Cairo no se han cumplido en su totalidad.

Por lo tanto la Asamblea General aprobó el programa Más allá de El Cairo 2014 , y los ha vinculado con los Objetivos del Milenio que terminan en el 2015.

A partir de ahora habrá un plan común, donde todo en la ONU viajará en el mismo sentido, en un nuevo plan de 15 años hasta el 2030.


RELANZAMIENTO REFORZADO DE LOS OBJETIVOS SINIESTROS EN UN PLAN DE 15 AÑOS
La conexión entre los objetivos de El Cairo y los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio es una obra maestra estratégica de los defensores de los “derechos a la salud sexual y reproductiva”.

Para una chica de un país pobre el tener libre acceso a la píldora del día después o al aborto será considerado un derecho como asistir a la escuela o el acceso al agua potable.

Los llamados derechos sexuales y reproductivos serán equiparados a los derechos humanos relacionados con el desarrollo.
Entonces, los Estados se verán obligados a aprobar cada vez más leyes de defensa de los “derechos humanos” y a establecer sistemas más eficaces para la penalización de sus violaciones.

UN SINIESTRO PLAN QUE VIENE DE “ARRIBA”
Marguerite Peeters, en dos artículos publicados en el “Boletín de la Doctrina Social de la Iglesia” el Observatorio Cardenal Van Thuan, ha explicado cómo la ONU quiere proceder en los quince años hasta el 2030 en el campo de los “nuevos derechos”.



El primer punto es que va a insistir aún más profundamente sobre la anticoncepción.
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Pero con especial énfasis en la difusión de la píldora del día después.
.
Que, según los expertos de la ONU, hasta ahora no ha sido promovida adecuadamente.


En segundo lugar, las Naciones Unidas y sus agencias, van a trabajar para incluir los nuevos derechos a la salud sexual y reproductiva en los derechos humanos universales como tales.
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De modo que los Estados que no los respeten pueden ser denunciados y condenados.
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Y la objeción de conciencia prevenirse o incluso prohibirse.


En tercer lugar, se decidió promover un cambio cultural y religioso “desde el interior”.
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Es decir, a partir de la participación como socios con las asociaciones culturales y las familias religiosas.
La estrategia es muy simple e inteligente: en la medida que junto a la anticoncepción y al aborto, el programa también presenta objetivos moralmente aceptables, los presentará como un paquete único.

Veamos un ejemplo sobre cómo se está desarrollando esto.

La mujer de más alto rango en el Vaticano dijo recientemente que el fortalecimiento de las organizaciones internacionales como las Naciones Unidas es la única manera de hacer frente a los problemas de la globalización.

Y predijo que “va a haber un movimiento para poner más acción ejecutiva” en las agencias internacionales.

La inglesa Margaret Archer, presidenta de la Pontificia Academia de Ciencias Sociales, dijo que la Iglesia debe “dejar a los gobiernos nacionales, donde están”.

Y tratar de influir en las organizaciones internacionales, como las Naciones Unidas, para tratar de obtener políticas implementadas dirigidas a “llevar a cabo el cambio social global”.



En cuarto lugar, está prevista una entrada masiva en las escuelas, comenzando con la infancia.
Como vemos, estas indicaciones que Marguerite Peeters ha extrapolado de los documentos oficiales de las Naciones Unidas y sus agencias, muestran que lo que estamos viendo que sucede en nuestra vida diaria responde a planes que se deciden y se financian desde poderes que están arriba en la organización mundial.


¿Y CUÁL ES ESE PODER?

Desde el punto de vista humano, es una casta de personas que no son elegidos democráticamente por ningún votación.

Ni en su mayoría son designados por los gobiernos, sino que básicamente son el resultado de acciones la burocracia de la ONU, que subcontratan a expertos externos.

Es una casta que decide la ética de todo el mundo y elabora proyectos financiados por poderosas fundaciones privadas, corporaciones globales, grupos farmacéuticos internacionales, etc.
La misma Marguerite Peeters, en su libro recientemente publicado en italiano “El género. Una cuestión política y cultural” (San Pablo), explica muy bien que alrededor de las cumbres como la de El Cairo giran muchos actores no gubernamentales:

“Una potente red de socios ideológicamente alineados que expanden exponencial y capilarmente el campo de influencia y de aplicación de sus reglas.

Escuelas, movimientos de mujeres, organizaciones juveniles, ONG de desarrollo, organizaciones caritativas, organizaciones locales, medios de comunicación, instituciones de salud, el mundo de la moda y el entretenimiento, círculos culturales, empresas, comunidades religiosas, etc… son inexorablemente expuestos”.

UN CONSENSO FICTICIO
Con esto, el cuadro está completo.

Ahora nos enfrentamos a un gobierno mundial no electo, que tiene sus propios planes.
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Financiado por asociaciones con privados, con una planificación central que luego se difunde y ramifica.

Su mantra es el “consenso”, pero es un consentimiento extorsionado por el adoctrinamiento, por la presión sobre los Estados, por el chantaje a los gobiernos de los países pobres, y una inundación de dinero.

POR PRIMERA VEZ LA ONU NO MENCIONA A LA FAMILIA
C-FAM, el lobby católico pro familia que opera en la ONU, destacó a principios de septiembre de 2015 que posiblemente por primera vez desde su fundación hace 70 años, un importante acuerdo de la ONU – que implica políticas sociales – no menciona a la familia.

En el corazón de la ONU históricamente se reconoce a la familia como el “elemento natural y fundamental de la sociedad.”

En primer lugar se indica en la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos.

Pero en Los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible – un plan de 15 años y de miles de millones de dólares que afecta a todos los países – no se menciona a la familia, con el potencial de convertirse en un precedente perjudicial.

Es que la Agenda al 2030 de la ONU tiene como meta muy evidente avanzar en un Gobierno Mundial – a través del código ‘desarrollo sostenible’, y para ello tiene que debilitar a la Familia y a las Naciones.
El plan de la ONU para el 2030, maneja un lenguaje cifrado (que más abajo descifraremos) puede leerse aquí.

Y veremos que encubre una política de establecer un gobierno mundial manejado por una elite.

EL GOBIERNO MUNDIAL QUE SE ESTÁ GESTANDO
Muchas personas creen que es necesario un gobierno global que sea cada vez más integral para el bienestar e incluso para la supervivencia de la humanidad.

Pero quizás no alcancen a comprender los problemas que puede traer.

La situación plantea varias cuestiones. ¿Cómo sería el trabajo del gobierno mundial, y quien lo ejecutaría?

Además, ¿los problemas que hoy tiene la humanidad son de tal urgencia que requieran tal concentración de poder?

Después de todo, el poder quiere el poder, y el gobierno mundial daría a las personas e instituciones que hoy tienen poder, mucho más de él.

Y los que tienen el poder saben cómo organizar el apoyo a sus objetivos.

La forma de legitimar este llamado a la ‘gobernanza mundial’ es proclamar que existe una amenaza global inminente.

Y la razón obvia para enfatizar la amenaza de una catástrofe global es, por supuesto, la preocupación por el futuro y el bien común; esto es hoy el calentamiento global o cambio climático.

Lo mismo podría decirse, sin embargo, con respecto a la amenaza de agresión externa y la subversión interna, o sobre las amenazas de la teocracia, o la eugenesia o el crecimiento demográfico desenfrenado o al revés el invierno demográfico.

Las predicciones de desastres deben ser consideradas con seriedad por sus méritos.

Las cosas malas suceden, y es bueno que puedan preverse, evitarse o al menos mitigarse.

Aun así, las profecías sobre la fatalidad se pueden utilizar para vender remedios que son innecesarios, provocar otros problemas, o resultar peor aún que la enfermedad.

Las personas comprometidas en la discusión pública hoy tienen intereses que favorecen fuertemente el gobierno global.

Los llamados Expertos favorecen esquemas regulatorios de efecto integral.

Los Periodistas de élite se concentran en discutir y decidir sobre entornos habitados por personas que manejan estas preocupaciones a favor del gobierno global.

Y las élites gobernantes en general, prefieren responder a sus colegas que a sus electores.

Así que ellos se inclinan hacia un gobierno global que amplía el poder solidario de clase y que reduce la capacidad de las personas para que sus gobernantes rindan cuentas.

Vale la pena señalar que las instituciones tradicionales e informales como la familia, la religión, la comunidad local y la cultura heredada no entran en la discusión en absoluto.
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Excepto como fuerzas extrañas, irracionales, perjudiciales, y potencialmente peligrosas que deben ser debilitadas tanto como sea posible para la coherencia y la eficiencia del sistema.

De ahí que, por ejemplo el fuerte perjuicio anti-familia de las grandes corporaciones y de las organizaciones internacionales.

Sólo una influencia popular que debilite un gobierno global puede contrarrestar estos perjuicios.

Los católicos deberían prestar consideraciones a esas preocupaciones y deberíamos mantener los ojos abiertos.

¿Cuál es el problema que estaría justificando un gobierno mundial realmente? ¿Qué tan grave es? ¿Qué medidas tomar? ¿Cuál será el resultado real de las soluciones propuestas?

¿Y quién va a controlar al gobierno global y asegurar que los problemas se traten de una forma racional y eficaz?

La última pregunta es difícil. La democracia global nos ha mostrado que la gente no puede supervisar a sus supuestos representantes; se les escapan.

Y es peor con los organismos internacionales, que se representan inevitablemente a sí mismos y a los poderosos.

Así es como causas impopulares a nivel mundial como la “agenda de género” se arraigan dentro de ellos.

Estamos en un punto de inflexión en este momento, en que los grandes poderes mundiales apresuran la marcha hacia un gobierno mundial.
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Y sucede en medio de la conjetura de los cristianos que está cerca el momento que emerja el anticristo.

Es así como llegamos al documento aprobado por la ONU que mencionamos más arriba y que establece el plan de acción de la ONU para los próximos 15 años, hasta el 2030.

Vamos a tratar de leerlo viendo lo que hay debajo de la palabrería.

DESCIFRANDO LOS 17 PUNTOS DEL DOCUMENTO DE DESARROLLO SUSTENTABLE DE LA ONU
El lector verá que en ninguna parte de este documento dice que “el logro de la libertad humana” sea una de sus metas.

Y tampoco explica cómo alcanzar estos objetivos, sino que esto queda abierto al arbitrio de los operadores de la ONU.

Como verás aquí, cada punto en esta agenda de la ONU ha de lograrse a través del control gubernamental centralizado y de mandatos totalitarios que se asemejan a un comunismo.

Enunciaremos el punto escrito en el documento de la ONU y luego traduciremos lo que significa realmente.

No queremos significar que todo lo que salga de este plan será siniestro, sino que está concebido para realizar cosas buenas y cosas siniestras.


Objetivo 1) Fin de la Pobreza en todas sus formas en todas partes
Traducción: Poner a todos en la asistencia social del gobierno, cupones de alimentos, subsidios de vivienda y otros que los harán esclavos obedientes del gobierno mundial.

No hay permisos para que las personas se ayuden a sí mismos.

En cambio, sí un gobierno que proporcione dinero mensual en “subsidios” para productos de primera necesidad como alimentos y medicinas, calificándolo como “acabar con la pobreza.”



Objetivo 2) Fin del hambre logrando la seguridad alimentaria, una mejor nutrición y promover la agricultura sostenible
Traducción: Invadir todo el planeta con los transgénicos y semillas patentadas de Monsanto y otras multinacionales, al tiempo que se aumenta el uso de herbicidas mortales bajo la falsa pretensión de “incrementar la producción” de los cultivos alimentarios.

Plantas modificadas genéticamente por ingenieros sin que se tenga idea de las consecuencias a largo plazo sobre la contaminación genética, o del efecto en animales, o de componente químicos que puedan servir para otras cosas (p.ej. la esterilización).

Esto es central para concentrar poder en pocas manos.



Objetivo 3) Asegurar y Promover una vida sana y el bienestar para todos en todas las edades
Traducción: Exigir vacunas para todos los niños y adultos para todo tipo de cosas, amenazando a los padres con la detención y el encarcelamiento si se niegan a cooperar.

Llamando a los programas masivos de medicación “prevención” y afirmando que estos mejoran la salud de los ciudadanos.

Pero se ha comprobado que detrás de esas vacunas y demás medicamentos hay operaciones de control de la población, por lo menos en países pobres.



Objetivo 4) Garantizar una educación de calidad inclusiva y equitativa que promueva oportunidades de aprendizaje permanente para todos
Traducción: Empujar estándares de educación que producen trabajadores obedientes en vez de pensadores independientes.

Erradicar los valores tradicionales, entre ellos los religiosos y restar importancia a la familia y promover la homosexualidad.

Objetivo 5) Lograr la igualdad de género y empoderar a las mujeres y a las niñas
Traducción: Penalizar al cristianismo, marginar la heterosexualidad, y promover la agenda LGBT en todas partes.

El objetivo real no es la “igualdad” sino marginar y avergonzar a todo el que exprese cualquier característica masculina de alguna manera o tenga prevenciones sobre el estilo de vida homosexual.

El objetivo final es feminizar la sociedad sobre una “obediencia gentil”.

Debido a que sólo la fuerza del hombre es posible para levantarse contra la opresión y luchar por los derechos humanos, el suprimir la fuerza masculina es la clave para mantener a la población en un estado de aceptación eterna.



Objetivo 6) Asegurar la disponibilidad y la gestión sostenible del agua e higiene para todos
Traducción: Permitir a las corporaciones poderosas tomar el control de las reservas de agua del mundo.

Y que cobren precios de monopolio para “construir una nueva infraestructura de suministro de agua” que “garantice la disponibilidad”.

Nuevamente vemos aquí la concentración de recursos vitales.


Objetivo 7) Garantizar el acceso a una energía asequible, fiable, sostenible y moderna para todos
Traducción: penalizar el carbón, el gas y el petróleo mientras empuja subsidios a la energía “verde”, manejada y centralizada por la elite.

A la vez que se controla la posibilidad de desarrollo relativamente autónomo de los países del tercer mundo porque dependerán de energía cara.



Objetivo 8) Promover un crecimiento sostenido, inclusivo y sostenible de la economía, del pleno empleo productivo y del trabajo decente para todos
Traducción: Regular a la pequeña empresa y el emprendedorismo, cristalizar los salarios mínimos impuestos por las autoridades.

Forzar a los empleadores a cumplir con la contratación de las cuotas de los trabajadores LGBT, destruir la economía de libre mercado.

Y negar permisos y licencias a las empresas que no obedezcan los dictámenes del gobierno.

Objetivo 9) Construir una infraestructura flexible que promueva la industrialización inclusiva, sostenible y el fomento de la innovación
Traducción: Poner a las naciones en una deuda extrema con el Banco Mundial.

Gastar ese dinero endeudado en contratar empresas multinacionales que construyan proyectos de infraestructura a gran escala que atrape a las naciones que se encuentran en desarrollo en una espiral sin fin para el pago de la deuda.

Ver el libro de Confesiones de un Sicario Económico de John Perkins para entender los detalles de cómo este esquema se ha repetido innumerables veces a lo largo de las últimas décadas.



Objetivo 10) Reducir las desigualdades dentro y entre los países
Traducción: Sancionar a los ricos, a los empresarios e innovadores, confiscando casi todas sus ganancias si optan por salirse del molde y sobresalir.

Redistribuyendo la riqueza confiscada hacia los parásitos que dependerán políticamente del gobierno central y sus delegados dentro de los países.



Objetivo 11) Convertir a las ciudades y a los asentamientos humanos en inclusivos, y lugares seguros y sostenibles
Traducción: Concentrar el poder en manos de fuerzas que obedezcan a los que gobiernan a través de una clase desarmada y esclavizada de trabajadores empobrecidos.

Tratar como criminales a quienes viven con valores tradicionales, por ejemplo en las zonas más rurales.

Forzar a todos los seres humanos a vivir en ciudades densas fuertemente controladas en las que se encuentren bajo la vigilancia 24/7 y estén sujetos a una fácil manipulación por el gobierno.



Objetivo 12) Velar por patrones de consumo y producción sostenibles
Traducción: Comenzar a recaudar impuestos punitivos sobre el consumo de combustibles fósiles y de electricidad.

Lo que obligará a la gente a vivir en peores condiciones y que cada vez se asemejarán más a las condiciones del Tercer Mundo.

Establecer patrones de consumo de alimentos a través de créditos por comida que uniformizará a la población.

Objetivo 13) Tomar medidas urgentes para combatir el cambio climático y su impacto
Traducción: Establecer cuotas de consumo de energía por cada ser humano y empezar a castigar o incluso a penalizar “las decisiones de estilo de vida” que excedan los límites de uso de energía establecidas por los gobiernos.

Penalizar la propiedad privada de vehículos y obligar a las masas a usar el transporte público, donde las cámaras puedan monitorear y registrar los movimientos de todas las personas de la sociedad.



Objetivo 14) Conservación y utilización de océanos, mares y recursos marinos para el desarrollo sostenible
Traducción: Prohibir selectivamente la pesca en el océano, sumiendo al suministro de alimentos en una escasez extrema y causando una galopante inflación en los alimentos que pondrá a la gente en una desesperación económica.

Penalizar la explotación de los buques de pesca privados y colocar todas las operaciones de pesca del océano bajo el control de la planificación del gobierno central.

Permitir sólo a las empresas favorecidas llevar a cabo las operaciones de pesca en el océano.



Objetivo 15) Proteger, restaurar y promover el uso sostenible de los ecosistemas terrestres, administrar de manera sostenible los bosques combatiendo la desertificación, detener y revertir la degradación del suelo y la pérdida de biodiversidad.
Traducción: Forzar a los seres humanos a abandonar sus tierra por ciudades controladas.

Penalizar como un delito la propiedad de tierras privadas, incluyendo ranchos y extensiones agrícolas.

Controlar firmemente toda la agricultura a través de una burocracia gubernamental-empresarial cuyas políticas estén determinadas casi en su totalidad por la producción transgénica.

Prohibir estufas a leña, recolección de aguas pluviales y jardinería doméstica con el fin de penalizarlas como delito a la autosuficiencia y forzar la dependencia del gobierno.



Objetivo 16) Promover sociedades pacíficas e inclusivas para un desarrollo sostenible, proveer acceso a la justicia para todos y la construcción de instituciones eficaces responsables e inclusivas en todos los niveles
Traducción: Conceder inmunidad legal a los inmigrantes ilegales y a los grupos minoritarios “protegidos”, que serán libres de participar en cualquier actividad ilegal, porque estos serán la nueva clase protegida en la sociedad.

“Instituciones inclusivas” significa la concesión de estructuras fiscales favorables y subvenciones del gobierno para que las empresas contraten trabajadores LGBT o cualquier otro grupo que se encuentre actualmente a favor de los planificadores centrales del gobierno.

Utilizar las oficinas de recaudación de impuestos para castigar selectivamente a grupos desfavorables con auditorías punitivas y acoso regulatorio, a la vez que se hará caso omiso de las actividades criminales en corporaciones favorecidas que sean amigos de la élite política.

Objetivo 17) Fortalecer los medios de aplicación y revitalizar la alianza mundial para el desarrollo sostenible
Traducción: Promulgar Mandatos de comercio global que anulen las leyes nacionales, mientras que habrá concesión de poderes nos restringidos a empresas que trabajan para la elite.

Se aprobarán pactos comerciales globales que omitirán a los legisladores de la nación y anularán las leyes de propiedad intelectual nacionales.

Para así asegurarse que las empresas más poderosas del mundo mantengan los monopolios totales de drogas, semillas, productos químicos y tecnologías.



Si lees el documento completo y puedes mirar más allá de las frases en código, pronto te darás cuenta que esta agenda de la ONU va a ser impuesta a todos los ciudadanos del mundo a través de la invocación de la coerción gubernamental.

Habrá cosas buenas en estos en el cumplimiento de estos planes, pero dan pie a innumerables cosas siniestras.
En ninguna parte de este documento dice que los derechos de la persona serán protegidos.
Tampoco se reconoce la existencia de los derechos humanos otorgados a los particulares por el Creador.
Incluso se niega el derecho a los individuos a la autodefensa, el derecho a la elección de médico y el derecho de control de los padres sobre sus propios hijos.

La ONU tiene previsto nada menos que un gobierno coercitivo de magnitud global para controlar férreamente a la humanidad, llamando a éste esquema “desarrollo sostenible” e “igualdad”.

La sociedad que describe George Orwell en “1984”, finalmente ha llegado.
.
Y por supuesto todo se está implementando bajo la etiqueta de “progreso”.

¿QUE ES LO QUE VEREMOS EN LOS PRÓXIMOS AÑOS?
De acuerdo a lo que ya hemos repasado, prestemos atención a estas cosas que probablemente veremos en estos próximos años.



En primer lugar un alineamiento cada vez mayor de las políticas nacionales con las centrales de la ONU.
.
En la medida que todos los planes de la ONU se entroncarán en un plan único de aquí al 2030.


En segundo lugar, programas cada vez más profundos para educación escolar sobre la ideología de género y la homosexualidad, el aborto y la anticoncepción.


En tercer lugar, cada vez más presión para programas que bajen la cantidad de población.
.
Entre ellos los que ya hablamos de promoción de la homosexualidad, el aborto y la anticoncepción.
.
Además de dudosos programas de vacunación para el tercer mundo y la promoción de la eutanasia.


En cuarto lugar, las religiones serán el escenario privilegiado donde se establecerá la lucha para la imposición de estos nuevos valores.
.
Porque son los oponentes más duros a esta política.
.
Y ya lo vimos en el Sínodo de la Familia en la Iglesia Católica y en las innumerables propuestas de aperturismo de parte de Obispos, movimientos de sacerdotes, de laicos, etc.


En quinto lugar, los medios de comunicación del sistema apuntarán aún más que hoy sus baterías para desinformar a los católicos.
.
Proimoviendo a las figuras “reformistas” dentro de la Iglesia, castigando a los ortodoxos, y realzando las actividades de grupos de laicos modernistas.


En sexto lugar, correrán ríos de dinero para financiar las iniciativas de “Caballo de Troya” dentro de las organizaciones relacionadas con las religiones.
.
Especialmente de la Iglesia Católica que es el adversario occidental más fuerte.
.
Y así veremos cada vez más poder de los medios de comunicación cristianos permeables a estos cambios, el crecimiento de los grupos de laicos y de religiosos/sacerdotes que propugnen cambios pastorales/doctrinales.
.
Y la promoción de acciones de voluntariado de grupos cristianos que se amolden a las nuevas metas de la ONU.


En séptimo lugar, habrá cada vez más avances hacia la concentración de poder tendiente a un poder central.
.
Veremos maniobras de la ONU para independizar del consenso de los países su acceso a fondos operativos, y el desarrollo de políticas mundiales – basadas en la ONU.
.
Que concentren poder, como por ejemplo a través de impuestos y control de las políticas anti cambio climático.

El Gobierno Mundial que está gestando la ONU para Cambiar la Moral del Mundo » Foros de la Virgen María
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  1. Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

    Preamble


    This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It also seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom. We recognise that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. All countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, will implement this plan. We are resolved to free the human race from the tyranny of poverty and want and to heal and secure our planet. We are determined to take the bold and transformative steps which are urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. As we embark on this collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets which we are announcing today demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal Agenda. They seek to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve. They seek to realize the human rights of all and to achieve gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls. They are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental.


    The Goals and targets will stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet:


    People


    We are determined to end poverty and hunger, in all their forms and dimensions, and to ensure that all human beings can fulfil their potential in dignity and equality and in a healthy environment.


    Planet


    We are determined to protect the planet from degradation, including through sustainable consumption and production, sustainably managing its natural resources and taking urgent action on climate change, so that it can support the needs of the present and future generations.


    Prosperity


    We are determined to ensure that all human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives and that economic, social and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature.


    Peace


    We are determined to foster peaceful, just and inclusive societies which are free from fear and violence. There can be no sustainable development without peace and no peace without sustainable development.


    Partnership


    We are determined to mobilize the means required to implement this Agenda through a revitalised Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, based on a spirit of strengthened global solidarity, focussed in particular on the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable and with the participation of all countries, all stakeholders and all people.


    The interlinkages and integrated nature of the Sustainable Development Goals are of crucial importance in ensuring that the purpose of the new Agenda is realised. If we realize our ambitions across the full extent of the Agenda, the lives of all will be profoundly improved and our world will be transformed for the better.


    DECLARATION


    Introduction


    1. We, the Heads of State and Government and High Representatives, meeting at the United Nations Headquarters in New York from 25-27 September 2015 as the Organization celebrates its seventieth anniversary, have decided today on new global Sustainable Development Goals.


    2. On behalf of the peoples we serve, we have adopted a historic decision on a comprehensive, far-reaching and people-centred set of universal and transformative Goals and targets. We commit ourselves to working tirelessly for the full implementation of this Agenda by 2030. We recognize that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. We are committed to achieving sustainable development in its three dimensions – economic, social and environmental – in a balanced and integrated manner. We will also build upon the achievements of the Millennium Development Goals and seek to address their unfinished business.


    3. We resolve, between now and 2030, to end poverty and hunger everywhere; to combat inequalities within and among countries; to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies; to protect human rights and promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; and to ensure the lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources. We resolve also to create conditions for sustainable, inclusive and sustained economic growth, shared prosperity and decent work for all, taking into account different levels of national development and capacities.


    4. As we embark on this great collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind. Recognizing that the dignity of the human person is fundamental, we wish to see the Goals and targets met for all nations and peoples and for all segments of society. And we will endeavour to reach the furthest behind first.


    5. This is an Agenda of unprecedented scope and significance. It is accepted by all countries and is applicable to all, taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and respecting national policies and priorities. These are universal goals and targets which involve the entire world, developed and developing countries alike. They are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development.


    6. The Goals and targets are the result of over two years of intensive public consultation and engagement with civil society and other stakeholders around the world, which paid particular attention to the voices of the poorest and most vulnerable. This consultation included valuable work done by the General Assembly Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals and by the United Nations, whose Secretary-General provided a synthesis report in December 2014.


    Our vision


    7. In these Goals and targets, we are setting out a supremely ambitious and transformational vision. We envisage a world free of poverty, hunger, disease and want, where all life can thrive. We envisage a world free of fear and violence. A world with universal literacy. A world with equitable and universal access to quality education at all levels, to health care and social protection, where physical, mental and social well-being are assured. A world where we reaffirm our commitments regarding the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation and where there is improved hygiene; and where food is sufficient, safe, affordable and nutritious. A world where human habitats are safe, resilient and sustainable and where there is universal access to affordable, reliable and sustainable energy.


    8. We envisage a world of universal respect for human rights and human dignity, the rule of law, justice, equality and non-discrimination; of respect for race, ethnicity and cultural diversity; and of equal opportunity permitting the full realization of human potential and contributing to shared prosperity. A world which invests in its children and in which every child grows up free from violence and exploitation. A world in which every woman and girl enjoys full gender equality and all legal, social and economic barriers to their empowerment have been removed. A just, equitable, tolerant, open and socially inclusive world in which the needs of the most vulnerable are met.


    9. We envisage a world in which every country enjoys sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and decent work for all. A world in which consumption and production patterns and use of all natural resources – from air to land, from rivers, lakes and aquifers to oceans and seas - are sustainable. One in which democracy, good governance and the rule of law as well as an enabling environment at national and international levels, are essential for sustainable development, including sustained and inclusive economic growth, social development, environmental protection and the eradication of poverty and hunger. One in which development and the application of technology are climate-sensitive, respect biodiversity and are resilient. One in which humanity lives in harmony with nature and in which wildlife and other living species are protected.


    Our shared principles and commitments


    10. The new Agenda is guided by the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, including full respect for international law. It is grounded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international human rights treaties, the Millennium Declaration and the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document. It is informed by other instruments such as the Declaration on the Right to Development.


    11. We reaffirm the outcomes of all major UN conferences and summits which have laid a solid foundation for sustainable development and have helped to shape the new Agenda. These include the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development; the World Summit on Sustainable Development; the World Summit for Social Development; the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Beijing Platform for Action; and the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development ("Rio+ 20"). We also reaffirm the follow-up to these conferences, including the outcomes of the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries, the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States; the Second United Nations Conference on Landlocked Developing Countries; and the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction.


    12. We reaffirm all the principles of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, including, inter alia, the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities, as set out in principle 7 thereof.


    13. The challenges and commitments contained in these major conferences and summits are interrelated and call for integrated solutions. To address them effectively, a new approach is needed. Sustainable development recognizes that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, combatting inequality within and among countries, preserving the planet, creating sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth and fostering social inclusion are linked to each other and are interdependent.


    Our world today


    14. We are meeting at a time of immense challenges to sustainable development. Billions of our citizens continue to live in poverty and are denied a life of dignity. There are rising inequalities within and among countries. There are enormous disparities of opportunity, wealth and power. Gender inequality remains a key challenge. Unemployment, particularly youth unemployment, is a major concern. Global health threats, more frequent and intense natural disasters, spiralling conflict, violent extremism, terrorism and related humanitarian crises and forced displacement of people threaten to reverse much of the development progress made in recent decades. Natural resource depletion and adverse impacts of environmental degradation, including desertification, drought, land degradation, freshwater scarcity and loss of biodiversity, add to and exacerbate the list of challenges which humanity faces. Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time and its adverse impacts undermine the ability of all countries to achieve sustainable development. Increases in global temperature, sea level rise, ocean acidification and other climate change impacts are seriously affecting coastal areas and low-lying coastal countries, including many least developed countries and small island developing States. The survival of many societies, and of the biological support systems of the planet, is at risk.


    15. It is also, however, a time of immense opportunity. Significant progress has been made in meeting many development challenges. Within the past generation, hundreds of millions of people have emerged from extreme poverty. Access to education has greatly increased for both boys and girls. The spread of information and communications technology and global interconnectedness has great potential to accelerate human progress, to bridge the digital divide and to develop knowledge societies, as does scientific and technological innovation across areas as diverse as medicine and energy.


    16. Almost fifteen years ago, the Millennium Development Goals were agreed. These provided an important framework for development and significant progress has been made in a number of areas. But the progress has been uneven, particularly in Africa, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries, and small island developing States, and some of the MDGs remain off-track, in particular those related to maternal, newborn and child health and to reproductive health. We recommit ourselves to the full realization of all the MDGs, including the off-track MDGs, in particular by providing focussed and scaled-up assistance to least developed countries and other countries in special situations, in line with relevant support programmes. The new Agenda builds on the Millennium Development Goals and seeks to complete what these did not achieve, particularly in reaching the most vulnerable.


    17. In its scope, however, the framework we are announcing today goes far beyond the MDGs. Alongside continuing development priorities such as poverty eradication, health, education and food security and nutrition, it sets out a wide range of economic, social and environmental objectives. It also promises more peaceful and inclusive societies. It also, crucially, defines means of implementation. Reflecting the integrated approach that we have decided on, there are deep interconnections and many cross-cutting elements across the new Goals and targets.


    The new Agenda


    18. We are announcing today 17 Sustainable Development Goals with 169 associated targets which are integrated and indivisible. Never before have world leaders pledged common action and endeavour across such a broad and universal policy agenda. We are setting out together on the path towards sustainable development, devoting ourselves collectively to the pursuit of global development and of "win-win" cooperation which can bring huge gains to all countries and all parts of the world. We reaffirm that every State has, and shall freely exercise, full permanent sovereignty over all its wealth, natural resources and economic activity. We will implement the Agenda for the full benefit of all, for today’s generation and for future generations. In doing so, we reaffirm our commitment to international law and emphasize that the Agenda is to be implemented in a manner that is consistent with the rights and obligations of states under international law.


    19. We reaffirm the importance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, as well as other international instruments relating to human rights and international law. We emphasize the responsibilities of all States, in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations, to respect, protect and promote human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction of any kind as to race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth, disability or other status.


    20. Realizing gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls will make a crucial contribution to progress across all the Goals and targets. The achievement of full human potential and of sustainable development is not possible if one half of humanity continues to be denied its full human rights and opportunities. Women and girls must enjoy equal access to quality education, economic resources and political participation as well as equal opportunities with men and boys for employment, leadership and decision-making at all levels. We will work for a significant increase in investments to close the gender gap and strengthen support for institutions in relation to gender equality and the empowerment of women at the global, regional and national levels. All forms of discrimination and violence against women and girls will be eliminated, including through the engagement of men and boys. The systematic mainstreaming of a gender perspective in the implementation of the Agenda is crucial.


    21. The new Goals and targets will come into effect on 1 January 2016 and will guide the decisions we take over the next fifteen years. All of us will work to implement the Agenda within our own countries and at the regional and global levels, taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and respecting national policies and priorities We will respect national policy space for sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, in particular for developing states, while remaining consistent with relevant international rules and commitments. We acknowledge also the importance of the regional and sub-regional dimensions, regional economic integration and interconnectivity in sustainable development. Regional and sub-regional frameworks can facilitate the effective translation of sustainable development policies into concrete action at national level.


    22. Each country faces specific challenges in its pursuit of sustainable development. The most vulnerable countries and, in particular, African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing states deserve special attention, as do countries in situations of conflict and post-conflict countries. There are also serious challenges within many middle-income countries.


    23. People who are vulnerable must be empowered. Those whose needs are reflected in the Agenda include all children, youth, persons with disabilities (of whom more than 80% live in poverty), people living with HIV/AIDS, older persons, indigenous peoples, refugees and internally displaced persons and migrants. We resolve to take further effective measures and actions, in conformity with international law, to remove obstacles and constraints, strengthen support and meet the special needs of people living in areas affected by complex humanitarian emergencies and in areas affected by terrorism.


    24. We are committed to ending poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including by eradicating extreme poverty by 2030. All people must enjoy a basic standard of living, including through social protection systems. We are also determined to end hunger and to achieve food security as a matter of priority and to end all forms of malnutrition. In this regard, we reaffirm the important role and inclusive nature of the Committee on World Food Security and welcome the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and Framework for Action. We will devote resources to developing rural areas and sustainable agriculture and fisheries, supporting smallholder farmers, especially women farmers, herders and fishers in developing countries, particularly least developed countries.


    25. We commit to providing inclusive and equitable quality education at all levels – early childhood, primary, secondary, tertiary, technical and vocational training. All people, irrespective of sex, age, race, ethnicity, and persons with disabilities, migrants, indigenous peoples, children and youth, especially those in vulnerable situations, should have access to life-long learning opportunities that help them acquire the knowledge and skills needed to exploit opportunities and to participate fully in society. We will strive to provide children and youth with a nurturing environment for the full realization of their rights and capabilities, helping our countries to reap the demographic dividend including through safe schools and cohesive communities and families.


    26. To promote physical and mental health and well-being, and to extend life expectancy for all, we must achieve universal health coverage and access to quality health care. No one must be left behind. We commit to accelerating the progress made to date in reducing newborn, child and maternal mortality by ending all such preventable deaths before 2030. We are committed to ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education. We will equally accelerate the pace of progress made in fighting malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, hepatitis, Ebola and other communicable diseases and epidemics, including by addressing growing anti-microbial resistance and the problem of unattended diseases affecting developing countries. We are committed to the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases, including behavioural, developmental and neurological disorders, which constitute a major challenge for sustainable development.


    27. We will seek to build strong economic foundations for all our countries. Sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth is essential for prosperity. This will only be possible if wealth is shared and income inequality is addressed. We will work to build dynamic, sustainable, innovative and people-centred economies, promoting youth employment and women’s economic empowerment, in particular, and decent work for all. We will eradicate forced labour and human trafficking and end child labour in all its forms. All countries stand to benefit from having a healthy and well-educated workforce with the knowledge and skills needed for productive and fulfilling work and full participation in society. We will strengthen the productive capacities of least-developed countries in all sectors, including through structural transformation. We will adopt policies which increase productive capacities, productivity and productive employment; financial inclusion; sustainable agriculture, pastoralist and fisheries development; sustainable industrial development; universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy services; sustainable transport systems; and quality and resilient infrastructure.


    28. We commit to making fundamental changes in the way that our societies produce and consume goods and services. Governments, international organizations, the business sector and other non-state actors and individuals must contribute to changing unsustainable consumption and production patterns, including through the mobilization, from all sources, of financial and technical assistance to strengthen developing countries’ scientific, technological and innovative capacities to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption and production. We encourage the implementation of the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production. All countries take action, with developed countries taking the lead, taking into account the development and capabilities of developing countries.


    29. We recognize the positive contribution of migrants for inclusive growth and sustainable development. We also recognize that international migration is a multi-dimensional reality of major relevance for the development of countries of origin, transit and destination, which requires coherent and comprehensive responses. We will cooperate internationally to ensure safe, orderly and regular migration involving full respect for human rights and the humane treatment of migrants regardless of migration status, of refugees and of displaced persons. Such cooperation should also strengthen the resilience of communities hosting refugees, particularly in developing countries. We underline the right of migrants to return to their country of citizenship, and recall that States must ensure that their returning nationals are duly received.


    30. States are strongly urged to refrain from promulgating and applying any unilateral economic, financial or trade measures not in accordance with international law and the Charter of the United Nations that impede the full achievement of economic and social development, particularly in developing countries.


    31. We acknowledge that the UNFCCC is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change. We are determined to address decisively the threat posed by climate change and environmental degradation. The global nature of climate change calls for the widest possible international cooperation aimed at accelerating the reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions and addressing adaptation to the adverse impacts of climate change. We note with grave concern the significant gap between the aggregate effect of Parties’ mitigation pledges in terms of global annual emissions of greenhouse gases by 2020 and aggregate emission pathways consistent with having a likely chance of holding the increase in global average temperature below 2 °C or 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels.


    32. Looking ahead to the COP21 conference in Paris in December, we underscore the commitment of all States to work for an ambitious and universal climate agreement. We reaffirm that the protocol, another legal instrument or agreed outcome with legal force under the Convention applicable to all Parties shall address in a balanced manner, inter alia, mitigation, adaptation, finance, technology development and transfer, and capacity-building, and transparency of action and support.


    33. We recognise that social and economic development depends on the sustainable management of our planet’s natural resources. We are therefore determined to conserve and sustainably use oceans and seas, freshwater resources, as well as forests, mountains and drylands and to protect biodiversity, ecosystems and wildlife. We are also determined to promote sustainable tourism, tackle water scarcity and water pollution, to strengthen cooperation on desertification, dust storms, land degradation and drought and to promote resilience and disaster risk reduction. In this regard, we look forward to COP13 of the Convention on Biological Diversity to be held in Mexico in 2016.


    34. We recognize that sustainable urban development and management are crucial to the quality of life of our people. We will work with local authorities and communities to renew and plan our cities and human settlements so as to foster community cohesion and personal security and to stimulate innovation and employment. We will reduce the negative impacts of urban activities and of chemicals which are hazardous for human health and the environment, including through the environmentally sound management and safe use of chemicals, the reduction and recycling of waste and more efficient use of water and energy. And we will work to minimize the impact of cities on the global climate system. We will also take account of population trends and projections in our national, rural and urban development strategies and policies. We look forward to the upcoming United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development in Quito, Ecuador.


    35. Sustainable development cannot be realized without peace and security; and peace and security will be at risk without sustainable development. The new Agenda recognizes the need to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies that provide equal access to justice and that are based on respect for human rights (including the right to development), on effective rule of law and good governance at all levels and on transparent, effective and accountable institutions. Factors which give rise to violence, insecurity and injustice, such as inequality, corruption, poor governance and illicit financial and arms flows, are addressed in the Agenda. We must redouble our efforts to resolve or prevent conflict and to support post-conflict countries, including through ensuring that women have a role in peace-building and state-building. We call for further effective measures and actions to be taken, in conformity with international law, to remove the obstacles to the full realization of the right of self-determination of peoples living under colonial and foreign occupation, which continue to adversely affect their economic and social development as well as their environment.


    36. We pledge to foster inter-cultural understanding, tolerance, mutual respect and an ethic of global citizenship and shared responsibility. We acknowledge the natural and cultural diversity of the world and recognize that all cultures and civilizations can contribute to, and are crucial enablers of, sustainable development.


    37. Sport is also an important enabler of sustainable development. We recognize the growing contribution of sport to the realization of development and peace in its promotion of tolerance and respect and the contributions it makes to the empowerment of women and of young people, individuals and communities as well as to health, education and social inclusion objectives.


    38. We reaffirm, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, the need to respect the territorial integrity and political independence of States.


    Means of Implementation


    39. The scale and ambition of the new Agenda requires a revitalized Global Partnership to ensure its implementation. We fully commit to this. This Partnership will work in a spirit of global solidarity, in particular solidarity with the poorest and with people in vulnerable situations. It will facilitate an intensive global engagement in support of implementation of all the Goals and targets, bringing together Governments, the private sector, civil society, the United Nations system and other actors and mobilizing all available resources.


    40. The means of implementation targets under Goal 17 and under each SDG are key to realising our Agenda and are of equal importance with the other Goals and targets. The Agenda, including the SDGs, can be met within the framework of a revitalized global partnership for sustainable development, supported by the concrete policies and actions as outlined in the outcome document of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development, held in Addis Ababa from 13-16 July 2015. We welcome the endorsement by the General Assembly of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, which is an integral part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. We recognize that the full implementation of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda is critical for the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals and targets.


    41. We recognize that each country has primary responsibility for its own economic and social development. The new Agenda deals with the means required for implementation of the Goals and targets. We recognize that these will include the mobilization of financial resources as well as capacity-building and the transfer of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed. Public finance, both domestic and international, will play a vital role in providing essential services and public goods and in catalyzing other sources of finance. We acknowledge the role of the diverse private sector, ranging from micro-enterprises to cooperatives to multinationals, and that of civil society organizations and philanthropic organizations in the implementation of the new Agenda.


    42. We support the implementation of relevant strategies and programmes of action, including the Istanbul Declaration and Programme of Action, the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway, the Vienna Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries for the Decade 2014-2024, and reaffirm the importance of supporting the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and the programme of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), all of which are integral to the new Agenda. We recognize the major challenge to the achievement of durable peace and sustainable development in countries in conflict and post-conflict situations.


    43. We emphasize that international public finance plays an important role in complementing the efforts of countries to mobilize public resources domestically, especially in the poorest and most vulnerable countries with limited domestic resources. An important use of international public finance, including ODA, is to catalyse additional resource mobilization from other sources, public and private. ODA providers reaffirm their respective commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7% of ODA/GNI to developing countries and 0.15% to 0.2% of ODA/GNI to least developed countries.


    44. We acknowledge the importance for international financial institutions to support, in line with their mandates, the policy space of each country, in particular developing countries. We recommit to broadening and strengthening the voice and participation of developing countries – including African countries, least developed countries, land-locked developing countries, small-island developing States and middle-income countries – in international economic decision-making, norm-setting and global economic governance.


    45. We acknowledge also the essential role of national parliaments through their enactment of legislation and adoption of budgets and their role in ensuring accountability for the effective implementation of our commitments. Governments and public institutions will also work closely on implementation with regional and local authorities, sub-regional institutions, international institutions, academia, philanthropic organisations, volunteer groups and others.


    46. We underline the important role and comparative advantage of an adequately resourced, relevant, coherent, efficient and effective UN system in supporting the achievement of the SDGs and sustainable development. While stressing the importance of strengthened national ownership and leadership at country level, we express our support for the ongoing ECOSOC Dialogue on the longer-term positioning of the United Nations development system in the context of this Agenda.


    Follow-up and review


    47. Our Governments have the primary responsibility for follow-up and review, at the national, regional and global levels, in relation to the progress made in implementing the Goals and targets over the coming fifteen years. To support accountability to our citizens, we will provide for systematic follow-up and review at the various levels, as set out in this Agenda and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. The High Level Political Forum under the auspices of the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council will have the central role in overseeing follow-up and review at the global level.


    48. Indicators are being developed to assist this work. Quality, accessible, timely and reliable disaggregated data will be needed to help with the measurement of progress and to ensure that no one is left behind. Such data is key to decision-making. Data and information from existing reporting mechanisms should be used where possible. We agree to intensify our efforts to strengthen statistical capacities in developing countries, particularly African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries, small island developing States and middle-income countries. We are committed to developing broader measures of progress to complement gross domestic product (GDP).


    A call for action to change our world


    49. Seventy years ago, an earlier generation of world leaders came together to create the United Nations. From the ashes of war and division they fashioned this Organization and the values of peace, dialogue and international cooperation which underpin it. The supreme embodiment of those values is the Charter of the United Nations.


    50. Today we are also taking a decision of great historic significance. We resolve to build a better future for all people, including the millions who have been denied the chance to lead decent, dignified and rewarding lives and to achieve their full human potential. We can be the first generation to succeed in ending poverty; just as we may be the last to have a chance of saving the planet. The world will be a better place in 2030 if we succeed in our objectives.


    51. What we are announcing today – an Agenda for global action for the next fifteen years – is a charter for people and planet in the twenty-first century. Children and young women and men are critical agents of change and will find in the new Goals a platform to channel their infinite capacities for activism into the creation of a better world.


    52. "We the Peoples" are the celebrated opening words of the UN Charter. It is "We the Peoples" who are embarking today on the road to 2030. Our journey will involve Governments as well as Parliaments, the UN system and other international institutions, local authorities, indigenous peoples, civil society, business and the private sector, the scientific and academic community – and all people. Millions have already engaged with, and will own, this Agenda. It is an Agenda of the people, by the people, and for the people – and this, we believe, will ensure its success.


    53. The future of humanity and of our planet lies in our hands. It lies also in the hands of today’s younger generation who will pass the torch to future generations. We have mapped the road to sustainable development; it will be for all of us to ensure that the journey is successful and its gains irreversible.


    Sustainable Development Goals and targets


    54. Following an inclusive process of intergovernmental negotiations, and based on the Proposal of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals , which includes a chapeau contextualising the latter, the following are the Goals and targets which we have agreed.


    55. The SDGs and targets are integrated and indivisible, global in nature and universally applicable, taking into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and respecting national policies and priorities. Targets are defined as aspirational and global, with each government setting its own national targets guided by the global level of ambition but taking into account national circumstances. Each government will also decide how these aspirational and global targets should be incorporated in national planning processes, policies and strategies. It is important to recognize the link between sustainable development and other relevant ongoing processes in the economic, social and environmental fields.


    56. In deciding upon these Goals and targets, we recognise that each country faces specific challenges to achieve sustainable development, and we underscore the special challenges facing the most vulnerable countries and, in particular, African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States, as well as the specific challenges facing the middle-income countries. Countries in situations of conflict also need special attention.


    57. We recognize that baseline data for several of the targets remain unavailable, and we call for increased support for strengthening data collection and capacity building in Member States, to develop national and global baselines where they do not yet exist. We commit to addressing this gap in data collection so as to better inform the measurement of progress, in particular for those targets below which do not have clear numerical targets.


    58. We encourage ongoing efforts by states in other fora to address key issues which pose potential challenges to the implementation of our Agenda; and we respect the independent mandates of those processes. We intend that the Agenda and its implementation would support, and be without prejudice to, those other processes and the decisions taken therein.


    59. We recognise that there are different approaches, visions, models and tools available to each country, in accordance with its national circumstances and priorities, to achieve sustainable development; and we reaffirm that planet Earth and its ecosystems are our common home and that ‘Mother Earth’ is a common expression in a number of countries and regions.


    Sustainable Development Goals
    • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
    • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
    • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
    • Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
    • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
    • Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
    • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
    • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
    • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
    • Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
    • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
    • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
    • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*
    • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
    • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
    • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
    • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development


    * Acknowledging that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change.


    Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere


    1.1 By 2030, eradicate extreme poverty for all people everywhere, currently measured as people living on less than $1.25 a day

    1.2 By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions
    1.3 Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable
    1.4 By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance
    1.5 By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters
    1.a Ensure significant mobilization of resources from a variety of sources, including through enhanced development cooperation, in order to provide adequate and predictable means for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, to implement programmes and policies to end poverty in all its dimensions
    1.b Create sound policy frameworks at the national, regional and international levels, based on pro-poor and gender-sensitive development strategies, to support accelerated investment in poverty eradication actions


    Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture


    2.1 By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round
    2.2 By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons
    2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment
    2.4 By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality
    2.5 By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed
    2.a Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries
    2.b Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets, including through the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round
    2.c Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility


    Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages


    3.1 By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births
    3.2 By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births and under-5 mortality to at least as low as 25 per 1,000 live births
    3.3 By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases
    3.4 By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being
    3.5 Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol
    3.6 By 2020, halve the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents
    3.7 By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes
    3.8 Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all
    3.9 By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination
    3.a Strengthen the implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in all countries, as appropriate
    3.b Support the research and development of vaccines and medicines for the communicable and non-communicable diseases that primarily affect developing countries, provide access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines, in accordance with the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health, which affirms the right of developing countries to use to the full the provisions in the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights regarding flexibilities to protect public health, and, in particular, provide access to medicines for all
    3.c Substantially increase health financing and the recruitment, development, training and retention of the health workforce in developing countries, especially in least developed countries and small island developing States
    3.d Strengthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks


    Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all


    4.1 By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes
    4.2 By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and pre-primary education so that they are ready for primary education
    4.3 By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university
    4.4 By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship
    4.5 By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations
    4.6 By 2030, ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy
    4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development
    4.a Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, non-violent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all
    4.b By 2020, substantially expand globally the number of scholarships available to developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States and African countries, for enrolment in higher education, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, in developed countries and other developing countries
    4.c By 2030, substantially increase the supply of qualified teachers, including through international cooperation for teacher training in developing countries, especially least developed countries and small island developing States


    Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls


    5.1 End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere
    5.2 Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation
    5.3 Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation
    5.4 Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate
    5.5 Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life
    5.6 Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences
    5.a Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws
    5.b Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women
    5.c Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels


    Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all


    6.1 By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all
    6.2 By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations
    6.3 By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally
    6.4 By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity
    6.5 By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate
    6.6 By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes
    6.a By 2030, expand international cooperation and capacity-building support to developing countries in water- and sanitation-related activities and programmes, including water harvesting, desalination, water efficiency, wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse technologies
    6.b Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management


    Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all


    7.1 By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services
    7.2 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix
    7.3 By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency
    7.a By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology
    7.b By 2030, expand infrastructure and upgrade technology for supplying modern and sustainable energy services for all in developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States, and land-locked developing countries, in accordance with their respective programmes of support


    Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all


    8.1 Sustain per capita economic growth in accordance with national circumstances and, in particular, at least 7 per cent gross domestic product growth per annum in the least developed countries
    8.2 Achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors
    8.3 Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage the formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial services
    8.4 Improve progressively, through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, with developed countries taking the lead
    8.5 By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value
    8.6 By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training
    8.7 Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms
    8.8 Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment
    8.9 By 2030, devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products
    8.10 Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance and financial services for all
    8.a Increase Aid for Trade support for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, including through the Enhanced Integrated Framework for Trade-Related Technical Assistance to Least Developed Countries
    8.b By 2020, develop and operationalize a global strategy for youth employment and implement the Global Jobs Pact of the International Labour Organization


    Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation


    9.1 Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all
    9.2 Promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and, by 2030, significantly raise industry’s share of employment and gross domestic product, in line with national circumstances, and double its share in least developed countries
    9.3 Increase the access of small-scale industrial and other enterprises, in particular in developing countries, to financial services, including affordable credit, and their integration into value chains and markets
    9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities
    9.5 Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending
    9.a Facilitate sustainable and resilient infrastructure development in developing countries through enhanced financial, technological and technical support to African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States
    9.b Support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries, including by ensuring a conducive policy environment for, inter alia, industrial diversification and value addition to commodities
    9.c Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020


    Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries


    10.1 By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average
    10.2 By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status
    10.3 Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard
    10.4 Adopt policies, especially fiscal, wage and social protection policies, and progressively achieve greater equality
    10.5 Improve the regulation and monitoring of global financial markets and institutions and strengthen the implementation of such regulations
    10.6 Ensure enhanced representation and voice for developing countries in decision-making in global international economic and financial institutions in order to deliver more effective, credible, accountable and legitimate institutions
    10.7 Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies
    10.a Implement the principle of special and differential treatment for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, in accordance with World Trade Organization agreements
    10.b Encourage official development assistance and financial flows, including foreign direct investment, to States where the need is greatest, in particular least developed countries, African countries, small island developing States and landlocked developing countries, in accordance with their national plans and programmes
    10.c By 2030, reduce to less than 3 per cent the transaction costs of migrant remittances and eliminate remittance corridors with costs higher than 5 per cent


    Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable


    11.1 By 2030, ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums
    11.2 By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons
    11.3 By 2030, enhance inclusive and sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management in all countries
    11.4 Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage
    11.5 By 2030, significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected and substantially decrease the direct economic losses relative to global gross domestic product caused by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations
    11.6 By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management
    11.7 By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities
    11.a Support positive economic, social and environmental links between urban, peri-urban and rural areas by strengthening national and regional development planning
    11.b By 2020, substantially increase the number of cities and human settlements adopting and implementing integrated policies and plans towards inclusion, resource efficiency, mitigation and adaptation to climate change, resilience to disasters, and develop and implement, in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, holistic disaster risk management at all levels
    11.c Support least developed countries, including through financial and technical assistance, in building sustainable and resilient buildings utilizing local materials


    Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns


    12.1 Implement the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, all countries taking action, with developed countries taking the lead, taking into account the development and capabilities of developing countries
    12.2 By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources
    12.3 By 2030, halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses
    12.4 By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment
    12.5 By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse
    12.6 Encourage companies, especially large and transnational companies, to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle
    12.7 Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities
    12.8 By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature
    12.a Support developing countries to strengthen their scientific and technological capacity to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption and production
    12.b Develop and implement tools to monitor sustainable development impacts for sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products
    12.c Rationalize inefficient fossil-fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption by removing market distortions, in accordance with national circumstances, including by restructuring taxation and phasing out those harmful subsidies, where they exist, to reflect their environmental impacts, taking fully into account the specific needs and conditions of developing countries and minimizing the possible adverse impacts on their development in a manner that protects the poor and the affected communities


    Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts*


    13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries
    13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning
    13.3 Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning
    13.a Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible
    13.b Promote mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in least developed countries and small island developing States, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities


    * Acknowledging that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change.


    Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development


    14.1 By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution
    14.2 By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans
    14.3 Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels
    14.4 By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics
    14.5 By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information
    14.6 By 2020, prohibit certain forms of fisheries subsidies which contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, eliminate subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and refrain from introducing new such subsidies, recognizing that appropriate and effective special and differential treatment for developing and least developed countries should be an integral part of the World Trade Organization fisheries subsidies negotiation
    14.7 By 2030, increase the economic benefits to Small Island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism
    14.a Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries
    14.b Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets
    14.c Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in UNCLOS, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of The Future We Want


    Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss


    15.1 By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements
    15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally
    15.3 By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world
    15.4 By 2030, ensure the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity, in order to enhance their capacity to provide benefits that are essential for sustainable development
    15.5 Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species
    15.6 Promote fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and promote appropriate access to such resources, as internationally agreed
    15.7 Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products
    15.8 By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species
    15.9 By 2020, integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into national and local planning, development processes, poverty reduction strategies and accounts
    15.a Mobilize and significantly increase financial resources from all sources to conserve and sustainably use biodiversity and ecosystems
    15.b Mobilize significant resources from all sources and at all levels to finance sustainable forest management and provide adequate incentives to developing countries to advance such management, including for conservation and reforestation
    15.c Enhance global support for efforts to combat poaching and trafficking of protected species, including by increasing the capacity of local communities to pursue sustainable livelihood opportunities


    Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels


    16.1 Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere
    16.2 End abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children
    16.3 Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all
    16.4 By 2030, significantly reduce illicit financial and arms flows, strengthen the recovery and return of stolen assets and combat all forms of organized crime
    16.5 Substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms
    16.6 Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels
    16.7 Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels
    16.8 Broaden and strengthen the participation of developing countries in the institutions of global governance
    16.9 By 2030, provide legal identity for all, including birth registration
    16.10 Ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms, in accordance with national legislation and international agreements
    16.a Strengthen relevant national institutions, including through international cooperation, for building capacity at all levels, in particular in developing countries, to prevent violence and combat terrorism and crime
    16.b Promote and enforce non-discriminatory laws and policies for sustainable development


    Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development


    Finance


    17.1 Strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection
    17.2 Developed countries to implement fully their official development assistance commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of ODA/GNI to developing countries and 0.15 to 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries; ODA providers are encouraged to consider setting a target to provide at least 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries
    17.3 Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources
    17.4 Assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief and debt restructuring, as appropriate, and address the external debt of highly indebted poor countries to reduce debt distress
    17.5 Adopt and implement investment promotion regimes for least developed countries


    Technology


    17.6 Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge sharing on mutually agreed terms, including through improved coordination among existing mechanisms, in particular at the United Nations level, and through a global technology facilitation mechanism
    17.7 Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed
    17.8 Fully operationalize the technology bank and science, technology and innovation capacity-building mechanism for least developed countries by 2017 and enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology


    Capacity-building


    17.9 Enhance international support for implementing effective and targeted capacity-building in developing countries to support national plans to implement all the sustainable development goals, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation


    Trade


    17.10 Promote a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization, including through the conclusion of negotiations under its Doha Development Agenda
    17.11 Significantly increase the exports of developing countries, in particular with a view to doubling the least developed countries’ share of global exports by 2020
    17.12 Realize timely implementation of duty-free and quota-free market access on a lasting basis for all least developed countries, consistent with World Trade Organization decisions, including by ensuring that preferential rules of origin applicable to imports from least developed countries are transparent and simple, and contribute to facilitating market access


    Systemic issues


    Policy and institutional coherence


    17.13 Enhance global macroeconomic stability, including through policy coordination and policy coherence
    17.14 Enhance policy coherence for sustainable development
    17.15 Respect each country’s policy space and leadership to establish and implement policies for poverty eradication and sustainable development


    Multi-stakeholder partnerships


    17.16 Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries
    17.17 Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships


    Data, monitoring and accountability


    17.18 By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing countries, including for least developed countries and small island developing States, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts
    17.19 By 2030, build on existing initiatives to develop measurements of progress on sustainable development that complement gross domestic product, and support statistical capacity-building in developing countries


    Means of implementation and the Global Partnership


    60. We reaffirm our strong commitment to the full implementation of this new Agenda. We recognize that we will not be able to achieve our ambitious Goals and targets without a revitalized and enhanced Global Partnership and comparably ambitious means of implementation. The revitalized Global Partnership will facilitate an intensive global engagement in support of implementation of all the goals and targets, bringing together Governments, civil society, the private sector, the United Nations system and other actors and mobilizing all available resources.


    61. The Agenda’s Goals and targets deal with the means required to realise our collective ambitions. The means of implementation targets under each SDG and Goal 17, which are referred to above, are key to realising our Agenda and are of equal importance with the other Goals and targets. We shall accord them equal priority in our implementation efforts and in the global indicator framework for monitoring our progress.


    62. This Agenda, including the SDGs, can be met within the framework of a revitalized global partnership for sustainable development, supported by the concrete policies and actions outlined in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda , which is an integral part of the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development. The Addis Ababa Action Agenda supports, complements and helps contextualize the 2030 Agenda’s means of implementation targets. These relate to domestic public resources, domestic and international private business and finance, international development cooperation, international trade as an engine for development, debt and debt sustainability, addressing systemic issues and science, technology, innovation and capacity-building, and data, monitoring and follow-up.


    63. Cohesive nationally owned sustainable development strategies, supported by integrated national financing frameworks, will be at the heart of our efforts. We reiterate that each country has primary responsibility for its own economic and social development and that the role of national policies and development strategies cannot be overemphasized. We will respect each country’s policy space and leadership to implement policies for poverty eradication and sustainable development, while remaining consistent with relevant international rules and commitments. At the same time, national development efforts need to be supported by an enabling international economic environment, including coherent and mutually supporting world trade, monetary and financial systems, and strengthened and enhanced global economic governance. Processes to develop and facilitate the availability of appropriate knowledge and technologies globally, as well as capacity-building, are also critical. We commit to pursuing policy coherence and an enabling environment for sustainable development at all levels and by all actors, and to reinvigorating the global partnership for sustainable development.


    64. We support the implementation of relevant strategies and programmes of action, including the Istanbul Declaration and Programme of Action, the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway, the Vienna Programme of Action for Landlocked Developing Countries for the Decade 2014-2024, and reaffirm the importance of supporting the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and the programme of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), all of which are integral to the new Agenda. We recognize the major challenge to the achievement of durable peace and sustainable development in countries in conflict and post-conflict situations.


    65. We recognize that middle-income countries still face significant challenges to achieve sustainable development. In order to ensure that achievements made to date are sustained, efforts to address ongoing challenges should be strengthened through the exchange of experiences, improved coordination, and better and focused support of the United Nations Development System, the international financial institutions, regional organizations and other stakeholders.


    66. We underscore that, for all countries, public policies and the mobilization and effective use of domestic resources, underscored by the principle of national ownership, are central to our common pursuit of sustainable development, including achieving the sustainable development goals. We recognize that domestic resources are first and foremost generated by economic growth, supported by an enabling environment at all levels.


    67. Private business activity, investment and innovation are major drivers of productivity, inclusive economic growth and job creation. We acknowledge the diversity of the private sector, ranging from micro-enterprises to cooperatives to multinationals. We call on all businesses to apply their creativity and innovation to solving sustainable development challenges. We will foster a dynamic and well-functioning business sector, while protecting labour rights and environmental and health standards in accordance with relevant international standards and agreements and other on-going initiatives in this regard, such as the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the labour standards of ILO, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and key multilateral environmental agreements, for parties to those agreements.


    68. International trade is an engine for inclusive economic growth and poverty reduction, and contributes to the promotion of sustainable development. We will continue to promote a universal, rules-based, open, transparent, predictable, inclusive, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as meaningful trade liberalization. We call on all WTO members to redouble their efforts to promptly conclude the negotiations on the Doha Development Agenda. We attach great importance to providing trade-related capacity-building for developing countries, including African countries, least-developed countries, landlocked developing countries, small island developing states and middle-income countries, including for the promotion of regional economic integration and interconnectivity.


    69. We recognize the need to assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief, debt restructuring and sound debt management, as appropriate. Many countries remain vulnerable to debt crises and some are in the midst of crises, including a number of least developed countries, small-island developing States and some developed countries. We reiterate that debtors and creditors must work together to prevent and resolve unsustainable debt situations. Maintaining sustainable debt levels is the responsibility of the borrowing countries; however we acknowledge that lenders also have a responsibility to lend in a way that does not undermine a country’s debt sustainability. We will support the maintenance of debt sustainability of those countries that have received debt relief and achieved sustainable debt levels.


    70. We hereby launch a Technology Facilitation Mechanism which was established by the Addis Ababa Action Agenda in order to support the sustainable development goals. The Technology Facilitation Mechanism will be based on a multi-stakeholder collaboration between Member States, civil society, private sector, scientific community, United Nations entities and other stakeholders and will be composed of: a United Nations Interagency Task Team on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs, a collaborative Multistakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs and an on-line platform.


    • The United Nations Interagency Task Team on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs will promote coordination, coherence, and cooperation within the UN System on STI related matters, enhancing synergy and efficiency, in particular to enhance capacity-building initiatives. The Task Team will draw on existing resources and will work with 10 representatives from the civil society, private sector, the scientific community, to prepare the meetings of the Multistakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the SDGs, as well as in the development and operationalization of the on-line platform, including preparing proposals for the modalities for the Forum and the on-line platform. The 10 representatives will be appointed by the Secretary General, for periods of two years. The Task Team will be open to the participation of all UN agencies, funds and programmes, and ECOSOC functional commissions and it will initially be composed by the entities that currently integrate the informal working group on technology facilitation, namely: UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations Environment Programme, UNIDO, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNCTAD, International Telecommunication Union, WIPO and the World Bank.
    • The on-line platform will be used to establish a comprehensive mapping of, and serve as a gateway for, information on existing STI initiatives, mechanisms and programmes, within and beyond the UN. The on-line platform will facilitate access to information, knowledge and experience, as well as best practices and lessons learned, on STI facilitation initiatives and policies. The online platform will also facilitate the dissemination of relevant open access scientific publications generated worldwide. The on-line platform will be developed on the basis of an independent technical assessment which will take into account best practices and lessons learned from other initiatives, within and beyond the United Nations, in order to ensure that it will complement, facilitate access to and provide adequate information on existing STI platforms, avoiding duplications and enhancing synergies.
    • The Multi-stakeholder Forum on Science Technology and Innovation for the SDGs will be convened once a year, for a period of two days, to discuss STI cooperation around thematic areas for the implementation of the SDGs, congregating all relevant stakeholders to actively contribute in their area of expertise. The Forum will provide a venue for facilitating interaction, matchmaking and the establishment of networks between relevant stakeholders and multi- stakeholder partnerships in order to identify and examine technology needs and gaps, including on scientific cooperation, innovation and capacity building, and also in order to help facilitate development, transfer and dissemination of relevant technologies for the SDGs. The meetings of the Forum will be convened by the President of the ECOSOC before the meeting of the High Level Political Forum under the auspices of ECOSOC or, alternatively, in conjunction with other fora or conferences, as appropriate, taking into account the theme to be considered and on the basis of a collaboration with the organizers of the other fora or conference. The meetings of the Forum will be co-chaired by two Member States and will result in a summary of discussions elaborated by the two co-chairs, as an input to the meetings of the High Level Political Forum, in the context of the follow-up and review of the implementation of the Post-2015 Development Agenda.
    • The meetings of the HLPF will be informed by the summary of the Multistakeholder Forum. The themes for the subsequent Multistakeholder Forum on Science Technology and Innovation for the SDGs will be considered by the High Level Political Forum on sustainable development, taking into account expert inputs from the Task Team.


    71. We reiterate that this Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals and targets, including the means of implementation are universal, indivisible and interlinked.


    Follow-up and review


    72. We commit to engage in systematic follow-up and review of implementation of this Agenda over the next fifteen years. A robust, voluntary, effective, participatory, transparent and integrated follow-up and review framework will make a vital contribution to implementation and will help countries to maximize and track progress in implementing this Agenda in order to ensure that no one is left behind.


    73. Operating at the national, regional and global levels, it will promote accountability to our citizens, support effective international cooperation in achieving this Agenda and foster exchanges of best practices and mutual learning. It will mobilize support to overcome shared challenges and identify new and emerging issues. As this is a universal Agenda, mutual trust and understanding among all nations will be important.


    74. Follow-up and review processes at all levels will be guided by the following principles:


    a. They will be voluntary and country-led, will take into account different national realities, capacities and levels of development and will respect policy space and priorities. As national ownership is key to achieving sustainable development, the outcome from national level processes will be the foundation for reviews at regional and global levels, given that the global review will be primarily based on national official data sources.
    b. They will track progress in implementing the universal Goals and targets, including the means of implementation, in all countries in a manner which respects their universal, integrated and interrelated nature and the three dimensions of sustainable development.
    c. They will maintain a longer-term orientation, identify achievements, challenges, gaps and critical success factors and support countries in making informed policy choices. They will help mobilize the necessary means of implementation and partnerships, support the identification of solutions and best practices and promote coordination and effectiveness of the international development system.
    d. They will be open, inclusive, participatory and transparent for all people and will support the reporting by all relevant stakeholders.
    e. They will be people-centred, gender-sensitive, respect human rights and have a particular focus on the poorest, most vulnerable and those furthest behind.
    f. They will build on existing platforms and processes, where these exist, avoid duplication and respond to national circumstances, capacities, needs and priorities. They will evolve over time, taking into account emerging issues and the development of new methodologies, and will minimize the reporting burden on national administrations.
    g. They will be rigorous and based on evidence, informed by country-led evaluations and data which is high-quality, accessible, timely, reliable and disaggregated by income, sex, age, race, ethnicity, migration status, disability and geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts.
    h. They will require enhanced capacity-building support for developing countries, including the strengthening of national data systems and evaluation programs, particularly in African countries, LDCs, SIDS and LLDCs and middle-income countries.
    i. They will benefit from the active support of the UN system and other multilateral institutions.


    75. The Goals and targets will be followed-up and reviewed using a set of global indicators. These will be complemented by indicators at the regional and national levels which will be developed by member states, in addition to the outcomes of work undertaken for the development of the baselines for those targets where national and global baseline data does not yet exist. The global indicator framework, to be developed by the Inter Agency and Expert Group on SDG Indicators, will be agreed by the UN Statistical Commission by March 2016 and adopted thereafter by the Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly, in line with existing mandates. This framework will be simple yet robust, address all SDGs and targets including for means of implementation, and preserve the political balance, integration and ambition contained therein.


    76. We will support developing countries, particularly African countries, LDCs, SIDS and LLDCs, in strengthening the capacity of national statistical offices and data systems to ensure access to high-quality, timely, reliable and disaggregated data. We will promote transparent and accountable scaling-up of appropriate public-private cooperation to exploit the contribution to be made by a wide range of data, including earth observation and geo-spatial information, while ensuring national ownership in supporting and tracking progress.


    77. We commit to fully engage in conducting regular and inclusive reviews of progress at sub-national, national, regional and global levels. We will draw as far as possible on the existing network of follow-up and review institutions and mechanisms. National reports will allow assessments of progress and identify challenges at the regional and global level. Along with regional dialogues and global reviews, they will inform recommendations for follow-up at various levels.


    National level


    78. We encourage all member states to develop as soon as practicable ambitious national responses to the overall implementation of this Agenda. These can support the transition to the SDGs and build on existing planning instruments, such as national development and sustainable development strategies, as appropriate.


    79. We also encourage member states to conduct regular and inclusive reviews of progress at the national and sub-national levels which are country-led and country-driven. Such reviews should draw on contributions from indigenous peoples, civil society, the private sector and other stakeholders, in line with national circumstances, policies and priorities. National parliaments as well as other institutions can also support these processes.


    Regional level


    80. Follow-up and review at the regional and sub-regional levels can, as appropriate, provide useful opportunities for peer learning, including through voluntary reviews, sharing of best practices and discussion on shared targets. We welcome in this respect the cooperation of regional and sub-regional commissions and organizations. Inclusive regional processes will draw on national-level reviews and contribute to follow-up and review at the global level, including at the High Level Political Forum on sustainable development (HLPF).


    81. Recognizing the importance of building on existing follow-up and review mechanisms at the regional level and allowing adequate policy space, we encourage all member states to identify the most suitable regional forum in which to engage. UN regional commissions are encouraged to continue supporting member states in this regard.


    Global level


    82. The HLPF will have a central role in overseeing a network of follow-up and review processes at the global level, working coherently with the General Assembly, ECOSOC and other relevant organs and forums, in accordance with existing mandates. It will facilitate sharing of experiences, including successes, challenges and lessons learned, and provide political leadership, guidance and recommendations for follow-up. It will promote system-wide coherence and coordination of sustainable development policies. It should ensure that the Agenda remains relevant and ambitious and should focus on the assessment of progress, achievements and challenges faced by developed and developing countries as well as new and emerging issues. Effective linkages will be made with the follow-up and review arrangements of all relevant UN Conferences and processes, including on LDCs, SIDS and LLDCs.


    83. Follow-up and review at the HLPF will be informed by an annual SDG Progress Report to be prepared by the Secretary General in cooperation with the UN System, based on the global indicator framework and data produced by national statistical systems and information collected at the regional level. The HLPF will also be informed by the Global Sustainable Development Report, which shall strengthen the science-policy interface and could provide a strong evidence-based instrument to support policy-makers in promoting poverty eradication and sustainable development. We invite the President of ECOSOC to conduct a process of consultations on the scope, methodology and frequency of the Report as well as its relation to the SDG Progress Report, the outcome of which should be reflected in the Ministerial Declaration of the HLPF session in 2016.


    84. The HLPF, under the auspices of ECOSOC, shall carry out regular reviews, in line with Resolution 67/290. Reviews will be voluntary, while encouraging reporting, and include developed and developing countries as well as relevant UN entities and other stakeholders, including civil society and the private sector. They shall be state-led, involving ministerial and other relevant high-level participants. They shall provide a platform for partnerships, including through the participation of major groups and other relevant stakeholders.


    85. Thematic reviews of progress on the Sustainable Development Goals, including cross-cutting issues, will also take place at the HLPF. These will be supported by reviews by the ECOSOC functional commissions and other inter-governmental bodies and forums which should reflect the integrated nature of the goals as well as the interlinkages between them. They will engage all relevant stakeholders and, where possible, feed into, and be aligned with, the cycle of the HLPF.


    86. We welcome, as outlined in the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, the dedicated follow-up and review for the Financing for Development outcomes as well as all the means of implementation of the SDGs which is integrated with the follow-up and review framework of this Agenda. The intergovernmentally agreed conclusions and recommendations of the annual ECOSOC Forum on Financing for Development will be fed into the overall follow-up and review of the implementation of this Agenda in the HLPF.


    87. Meeting every four years under the auspices of the General Assembly, the HLPF will provide high-level political guidance on the Agenda and its implementation, identify progress and emerging challenges and mobilize further actions to accelerate implementation. The next HLPF, under the auspices of the General Assembly, will take place in 2019, with the cycle of meetings thus reset, in order to maximize coherence with the Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review process.


    88. We also stress the importance of system-wide strategic planning, implementation and reporting in order to ensure coherent and integrated support to implementation of the new Agenda by the UN development system. The relevant governing bodies should take action to review such support to implementation and to report on progress and obstacles. We welcome the ongoing ECOSOC Dialogues on the longer term positioning of the UN development system and look forward to taking action on these issues, as appropriate.


    89. The HLPF will support participation in follow-up and review processes by the major groups and other relevant stakeholders in line with Resolution 67/290. We call on these actors to report on their contribution to the implementation of the Agenda.


    90. We request the Secretary General, in consultation with Member States, to prepare a report, for consideration at the 70th session of the General Assembly in preparation for the 2016 meeting of the HLPF, which outlines critical milestones towards coherent efficient, and inclusive follow-up and review at the global level. This report should include a proposal on the organizational arrangements for state-led reviews at the HLPF under the auspices of ECOSOC, including recommendations on a voluntary common reporting guidelines. It should clarify institutional responsibilities and provide guidance on annual themes, on a sequence of thematic reviews, and on options for periodic reviews for the HLPF.


    91. We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to achieving this Agenda and utilizing it to the full to transform our world for the better by 2030.

    UNITED NATIONS

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS
The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the world's best plan to build a better world for people and our planet by 2030. Adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, the SDGs are a call for action by all countries - poor, rich and middle-income - to promote prosperity while protecting the environment. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and address a range of social needs including education, health, equality and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and working to preserve our ocean and forests.

The Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) in the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) provides substantive support and capacity-building for the SDGs and their related thematic issues, including water, energy, climate, oceans, urbanization, transport, science and technology, the Global Sustainable Development Report (GSDR), partnerships and Small Island Developing States. DSDG plays a key role in the evaluation of UN systemwide implementation of the 2030 Agenda and on advocacy and outreach activities relating to the SDGs.

Click here to learn more about the SDGs.





https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg5




 
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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS
The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the world's best plan to build a better world for people and our planet by 2030. Adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, the SDGs are a call for action by all countries - poor, rich and middle-income - to promote prosperity while protecting the environment. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and address a range of social needs including education, health, equality and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and working to preserve our ocean and forests.

The Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) in the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) provides substantive support and capacity-building for the SDGs and their related thematic issues, including water, energy, climate, oceans, urbanization, transport, science and technology, the Global Sustainable Development Report (GSDR), partnerships and Small Island Developing States. DSDG plays a key role in the evaluation of UN systemwide implementation of the 2030 Agenda and on advocacy and outreach activities relating to the SDGs.

Click here to learn more about the SDGs.









 

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La Agenda 2030 de las Naciones Unidas decodificada: es un plan para la esclavitud global de la humanidad bajo el control de las corporaciones
Publié par Contra información sur 7 Juin 2018, 11:18am

Esta semana, Michael Snyder publicó un importante artículo titulado La Agenda 2030: Este mes La ONU lanza un plan para un nuevo orden mundial con la ayuda del Papa .

Ese artículo hace referencia a este documento de la “Agenda 2030” de la ONUque impulsa un plan para el llamado “desarrollo sostenible” en todo el mundo.

Este documento describe nada menos que una toma de control global del gobierno de cada nación en todo el planeta . Los “objetivos” de este documento no son más que palabras clave para una agenda fascista corporativa-gubernamental que encarcelará a la humanidad en un devastador ciclo de pobreza mientras enriquece a las corporaciones globalistas más poderosas del mundo como Monsanto y DuPont.

Con el interés de ayudar a despertar a la humanidad, he decidido traducir los 17 puntos de esta agenda 2030 para que los lectores de todo el mundo puedan entender lo que realmente exige este documento. Para realizar esta traducción, debes entender cómo los globalistas disfrazan sus agendas monopólicas en un lenguaje de “sentirse bien”.

Aquí está la traducción punto por punto. Observe cuidadosamente que en ninguna parte este documento declara que “lograr la libertad humana” es uno de sus objetivos .Tampoco explica cómo deben lograrse estos objetivos. Como verá aquí, cada punto de la agenda de la ONU debe lograrse a través del control centralizado del gobierno y los mandatos totalitarios que se asemejan al comunismo.

Traducción del borrador de la “Agenda 2030 de la ONU para un gobierno “globalista” (controlado por intereses corporativos)
Objetivo 1) Terminar con la pobreza en todas sus formas en todas partes

Traducción: Ponga a todos en el bienestar del gobierno, cupones de alimentos, subsidios de vivienda y folletos que los conviertan en esclavos obedientes del gobierno mundial. Nunca permitira que las personas se muevan hacia arriba para ayudarse a sí mismas. En lugar de eso, enseña la victimización masiva y la obediencia a un gobierno que proporciona dinero mensual de “subsidios” para artículos básicos como alimentos y medicinas. Llamémoslo “terminar con la pobreza”.

Objetivo 2) Acabar con el hambre, lograr la seguridad alimentaria y una nutrición mejorada y promover la agricultura sostenible

Traducción: Invade el planeta entero con OGM y semillas patentadas de Monsanto, al tiempo que aumenta el uso de herbicidas mortales bajo el falso reclamo de “aumento de la producción” de cultivos alimentarios. El ingeniero modificó genéticamente las plantas para estimular los químicos vitamínicos específicos sin tener idea de las consecuencias a largo plazo de la contaminación genética o los experimentos genéticos entre especies llevados a cabo abiertamente en un ecosistema frágil.

Objetivo 3) Asegurar vidas saludables y promover el bienestar para todos a todas las edades

Traducción: Mandato de más de 100 vacunas para todos los niños y adultos a punta de pistola, amenazando a los padres con el arresto y la prisión si se niegan a cooperar. Impulsar el uso de medicamentos intensivos en niños y adolescentes mientras se implementan programas de “detección”. Llame a los programas de “prevención” de medicamentos en masa y reclame que mejoran la salud de los ciudadanos.

Objetivo 4) Garantizar una educación de calidad inclusiva y equitativa y promover oportunidades de aprendizaje permanente para todos

Traducción: Promover una historia falsa y una educación simplista bajo los estándares de educación “Common Core” que producir trabajadores obedientes en lugar de pensadores independientes. Nunca permitirán que las personas aprendan la historia real, o de lo contrario se darán cuenta de que no quieren repetirla.

Objetivo 5) Lograr la igualdad de género y empoderar a todas las mujeres y niñas

Traducción: Criminalizar el cristianismo, marginar la heterosexualidad, demonizar a los hombres y promover la agenda LGBT en todas partes. El verdadero objetivo nunca es la “igualdad” sino la marginación y la vergüenza de cualquiera que exprese cualquier característica masculina. El objetivo final es feminizar la sociedad, creando una aceptación generalizada de la “obediencia suave” junto con las ideas autodestructivas de propiedad comunal y “compartir” todo. Debido a que solo la energía masculina tiene la fuerza para levantarse contra la opresión y luchar por los derechos humanos, la supresión de la energía masculina es clave para mantener a la población en un estado de aquiescencia eterna.

Objetivo 6) Garantizar la disponibilidad y la gestión sostenible del agua y el saneamiento para todos

Traducción: Permite que las corporaciones poderosas tomen el control de los suministros de agua de todo el mundo y cobren precios de monopolio para “construir una nueva infraestructura de suministro de agua” que “garantice la disponibilidad”.

Objetivo 7) Garantizar el acceso a una energía asequible, confiable, sostenible y moderna para todos

Traducción: Penalizar el carbón, el gas y el petróleo mientras impulsa los subsidios de energía “verdes” condenados al fracaso a nuevas empresas con muerte cerebral encabezadas por amigos de la Casa Blanca, quienes van a la bancarrota en cinco años o menos. Las nuevas empresas ecológicas producen discursos impresionantes y cobertura mediática, pero debido a que estas empresas están lideradas por idiotas corruptos en lugar de empresarios capaces, siempre van a la quiebra. (Y los medios esperan que no recuerde toda la fanfarria que rodea su lanzamiento original).


Meditation room: Sala de meditación y oración de las Naciones Unidas, altar satánico, la pintura del fondo muestra una hoz que representa el sacrificio humano y el planeta Saturno

Objetivo 8) Promover el crecimiento económico sostenido, inclusivo y sostenible, el empleo pleno y productivo y un trabajo decente para todos

Traducción: regular la desaparición de las pequeñas empresas con salarios mínimos obligatorios por el gobierno que harán quebrar sectores enteros de la economía. Obligar a los empleadores a cumplir con las cuotas de contratación de trabajadores LGBT, mientras que los niveles salariales en virtud de una economía de trabajo de planificación central dictada por el gobierno. Destruirá la economía de libre mercado y negará los permisos y licencias a aquellas compañías que no obedezcan los dictados del gobierno.

Objetivo 9) Construir una infraestructura resiliente, promover la industrialización inclusiva y sostenible y fomentar la innovación

Traducción: Poner a las naciones en deuda extrema con el Banco Mundial, gastando dinero de la deuda para contratar corporaciones estadounidenses corruptas para construir proyectos de infraestructura a gran escala que atrapen a las naciones en desarrollo en una espiral interminable de deudas. Vea el libro Confessions of an Economic Hit Man de John Perkins para entender los detalles de cómo este esquema se ha repetido innumerables veces en las últimas décadas.

Objetivo 10) Reducir la desigualdad dentro y entre los países

Traducción: Castigue a los ricos, a los emprendedores y a los innovadores, confiscando casi todos los logros de aquellos que eligen trabajar y sobresalir. Redistribuya la riqueza confiscada entre las masas de parásitos humanos que no trabajan y que se alimentan de una economía productiva sin contribuir a nada … ¡mientras gritan por la “igualdad”!

Objetivo 11) Hacer que las ciudades y los asentamientos humanos sean inclusivos, seguros, resilientes y sostenibles

Traducción: Prohibir toda posesión de armas por parte de ciudadanos privados, concentrando las armas en manos de obedientes agentes del gobierno que gobiernan una clase de trabajadores empobrecidos desarmados y esclavizados. Tipificar como delito la vida en la mayoría de las zonas rurales mediante la institución de “áreas protegidas” al estilo de los Juegos del Hambre, que el gobierno alegará que pertenecen al “Pueblo”, aunque no se permita que vivan allí. Forzar a todos los humanos a vivir en ciudades densamente pobladas y fuertemente controladas donde están bajo vigilancia las 24 horas, los 7 días de la semana y sujetas a una fácil manipulación por parte del gobierno.

Objetivo 12) Garantizar patrones de consumo y producción sostenibles

Traducción: Comenzar a cobrar impuestos punitivos sobre el consumo de combustibles fósiles y electricidad, obligando a las personas a vivir en condiciones de empeoramiento del nivel de vida que se asemejan cada vez más a las condiciones del Tercer Mundo. Se realizarán campañas de influencia social en la televisión, las películas y las redes sociales para avergonzar a las personas que usan gasolina, agua o electricidad, estableciendo una construcción social de delincuentes y chismosos que delatan a sus vecinos a cambio de recompensas de créditos alimenticios.

Objetivo 13) Tomar medidas urgentes para combatir el cambio climático y sus impactos

Traducción: se establecerán cuotas de consumo de energía en cada ser humano y se comenzara a castigar o incluso criminalizar las “decisiones de estilo de vida” que exceden los límites de uso de energía establecidos por los gobiernos. Instituto de vigilancia total de las personas con el fin de rastrear y calcular su consumo de energía. Se penalizara la propiedad de vehículos privados y se forzara a las masas a usar el transporte público, donde la TSA por medio de cámaras de reconocimiento facial podrán monitorear y registrar el movimiento de cada persona en la sociedad, como una escena arrancada de Minority Report .

Objetivo 14) Conservar y utilizar de forma sostenible los océanos, los mares y los recursos marinos para el desarrollo sostenible

Traducción: Prohibir la pesca en el océano, hundiendo el suministro de alimentos en una escasez extrema y causando una inflación desorbitada de los precios de los alimentos que pone aún más personas en la desesperación económica. Criminalizar el funcionamiento de embarcaciones de pesca privadas y colocar todas las operaciones de pesca oceánica bajo el control de la planificación central del gobierno. Solo se permitirá que las empresas favorecidas realicen operaciones de pesca oceánica (y haga que esta decisión se base completamente en qué empresas otorgan la mayor cantidad de contribuciones de campaña a los legisladores corruptos).

Objetivo 15) Proteger, restaurar y promover el uso sostenible de los ecosistemas terrestres, gestionar los bosques de manera sostenible, luchar contra la desertificación, detener y revertir la degradación de la tierra y detener la pérdida de biodiversidad

Traducción: Implementar la Agenda 21 y obligar a los humanos a abandonar la tierra y las ciudades controladas. Criminalizar la propiedad privada de la tierra, incluidos los ranchos y las zonas agrícolas. Controlar firmemente toda la agricultura a través de una burocracia gubernamental corrompida por las corporaciones cuyas políticas están determinadas casi en su totalidad por Monsanto, mientras el USDA le da un sello de goma. Prohibir las estufas de leña, la recolección de agua de lluvia y la jardinería doméstica para criminalizar la autosuficiencia y forzar la total dependencia del gobierno.

Meta 16) Promover sociedades pacíficas e inclusivas para el desarrollo sostenible, proporcionar acceso a la justicia para todos y crear instituciones eficaces, responsables e inclusivas en todos los niveles

Traducción: Otorgar inmunidad legal a los extranjeros ilegales y grupos minoritarios “protegidos”, que podrán participar libremente en cualquier actividad ilegal, incluida la convocatoria abierta de asesinatos en masa de agentes de policía, porque son la nueva clase protegida de la sociedad. “Instituciones inclusivas” significa otorgar estructuras fiscales favorables y subvenciones gubernamentales a las empresas que contraten trabajadores LGBT o cualquier grupo que esté actualmente a favor de los planificadores centrales en el gobierno. Utilizar el IRS y otras agencias federales para castigar selectivamente a los grupos desfavorables con auditorías punitivas y acoso reglamentario, todo ello mientras ignora las actividades delictivas de las corporaciones favorecidas que son amigos de la elite política.

Objetivo 17) Fortalecer los medios de implementación y revitalizar la asociación mundial para el desarrollo sostenible

Traducción: promulgar mandatos de comercio mundial que anulan las leyes nacionales y otorgan poderes irrestrictos al imperialismo a compañías como Monsanto, Dow Chemical, RJ Reynolds, Coca-Cola y Merck. Apruebar los pactos comerciales globales que eluden a los legisladores de una nación y anular las leyes de propiedad intelectual para asegurarse de que las corporaciones más poderosas del mundo mantengan monopolios totales sobre los medicamentos, las semillas, los productos químicos y la tecnología. Anular las leyes nacionales y exigir total obediencia global a los acuerdos comerciales creados por poderosas corporaciones y sellados por la ONU.

La esclavización total del planeta para 2030
Como dice el documento de la ONU, “nos comprometemos a trabajar incansablemente para la plena implementación de esta Agenda para el año 2030”.

Si lees el documento completo y puedes leer más allá de las frases de fluffery y relaciones públicas, rápidamente te darás cuenta de que esta agenda de la ONU va a ser obligatoria para todos los ciudadanos del mundo mediante la invocación de la coerción gubernamental. En ningún lugar este documento establece que los derechos del individuo estarán protegidos. Ni siquiera reconoce la existencia de los derechos humanos otorgados a los individuos por el Creador. Incluso la llamada “Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos” niega por completo a las personas el derecho a la autodefensa, el derecho a la opción médica y el derecho al control parental de sus propios hijos.

La ONU está planeando nada menos que una tiranía del gobierno global que esclaviza a toda la humanidad mientras llama al esquema “desarrollo sostenible” e “igualdad”.

1984 finalmente ha llegado. Y, por supuesto, todo se desarrolla bajo la etiqueta fraudulenta de “progreso”.

Fuente: naturalnews

Traducción: chemtrailsevilla



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‘Stupid Society’. Autosexual: te amas, cásate contigo mismo

Se trata de una orientación sexual en sí misma, pero que suele generar confusión por tener una frecuencia muy baja. Todo se andará.
Hispanidad 25/06/19 19:32

Autosexuales, enamorados de sí mismos

¿Sabían que uno puede sentirse atraído por uno mismo y que esto sucede hasta el punto en que nada ni nadie nos excite más que nuestro propio cuerpo? Yo no tenía ni idea. Hasta que leí este ilustrativo, que no valorativo, artículo de El País sobre la autosexualidad titulado ‘Ni hetero ni homosexual: soy autosexual y estoy enamorada de mí misma’.

La autosexualidad va un paso más a la idea de quererse, mimarse, y tener una sana autoestima. La sexóloga Emma Placer, insiste en que se trata de una orientación sexual en sí misma, pero que suele generar confusión por tener una frecuencia muy baja. "Es fácil confundir el narcisismo con esta orientación, pero tiene algunas diferencias fundamentales, sobre todo porque el trastorno de la personalidad narcisista necesita publico".

Atentos, porque para Placer -curioso apellido para el tema que nos ocupa- la clave de la autosexualidad no parece estar en el hecho de gustarse uno mismo, sino en que nadie puede superar ese nivel de amor propio.

Para completar su información emplea El País otros testimonios ‘autosexuales’. Por ejemplo, el de la escritora Ghia Vitale que narra así su propia experiencia como autosexual: "Salgo a tomar un café, salgo a pasear por la naturaleza, me visto con lencería y me acurruco a mí misma, o simplemente me siento en la oscuridad y disfruto de mi propia presencia". "Como autorromántica, experimento la relación que tengo conmigo misma como romántica. Y como la relación que tengo conmigo misma es romántica, me trato a mí misma como si tratara a un amante. Mi tiempo a solas para mí es esencialmente sagrado".

Aunque están plenos de amor, la realidad de los autosexuales es dura… la mayoría acude a consulta cuando "le genera malestar más allá de la opinión de los demás, si siente frustración, tristeza, soledad, ante el hecho de que los demás no entiendan su comportamiento", revela Emma Placer. Pero, para la sexóloga no tiene por qué convertirse en un problema. De hecho, la orientación de autosexual afirma Placer "sería perfectamente combinable con una pareja que entienda nuestra forma de comportarnos sexualmente, y que también la use como recurso y juego".

Sin duda, se trata de uno de los 112 sexos recogidos por Naciones Unidas. O a lo peor es el 113.

Naturalmente, El País no se ha permitido la veleidad de enjuiciar las profundas declaraciones de la señá Placer sobre los autosexuales. Si empiezas a distinguir entre lo bueno y lo malo corres el riesgo de convertirte en animal racional, una especie que se distignue precisamente por eso: por emitir juicios de valor. Ante todo, por distinguir entre el bien y el mal.
 
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La Agenda de la ONU/Vaticano (infliltrado por masones y satanistas), mediante la cual se pretende destruir al Cristianismo=Dios Creador, hace décadas que lleva fraguándose.



¿QUÉ ES LA CARTA DE LA TIERRA?
La Carta de la Tierra es una declaración de principios éticos fundamentales para la construcción de una sociedad global justa, sostenible y pacífica en el Siglo XXI. La Carta busca inspirar en todas las personas un nuevo sentido de interdependencia global y de responsabilidad compartida para el bienestar de toda la familia humana, de la gran comunidad de vida y de las futuras generaciones. La Carta es una visión de esperanza y un llamado a la acción.

La Carta de la Tierra
Estamos en un momento crítico de la historia de la Tierra, en el cual la humanidad debe elegir su futuro. A medida que el mundo se vuelve cada vez más interdependiente y frágil, el futuro depara, a la vez, grandes riesgos y grandes promesas. Para seguir adelante, debemos reconocer que, en medio de la magnífica diversidad de culturas y formas de vida, somos una sola familia humana y una sola comunidad terrestre con un destino común. Debemos unirnos para crear una sociedad global sostenible fundada en el respeto hacia la naturaleza, los derechos humanos universales, la justicia económica y una cultura de paz. En torno a este fin, es imperativo que nosotros, los pueblos de la Tierra, declaremos nuestra responsabilidad unos hacia otros, hacia la gran comunidad de la vida y hacia las generaciones futuras.

La Tierra, nuestro hogar
La humanidad es parte de un vasto universo evolutivo. La Tierra, nuestro hogar, está viva con una comunidad singular de vida. Las fuerzas de la naturaleza promueven a que la existencia sea una aventura exigente e incierta, pero la Tierra ha brindado las condiciones esenciales para la evolución de la vida. La capacidad de recuperación de la comunidad de vida y el bienestar de la humanidad dependen de la preservación de una biosfera saludable, con todos sus sistemas ecológicos, una rica variedad de plantas y animales, tierras fértiles, aguas puras y aire limpio. El medio ambiente global, con sus recursos finitos, es una preocupación común para todos los pueblos. La protección de la vitalidad, la diversidad y la belleza de la Tierra es un deber sagrado.

La situación global
Los patrones dominantes de producción y consumo están causando devastación ambiental, agotamiento de recursos y una extinción masiva de especies. Las comunidades están siendo destruidas. Los beneficios del desarrollo no se comparten equitativamente y la brecha entre ricos y pobres se está ensanchando. La injusticia, la pobreza, la ignorancia y los conflictos violentos se manifiestan por doquier y son la causa de grandes sufrimientos. Un aumento sin precedentes de la población humana ha sobrecargado los sistemas ecológicos y sociales. Los fundamentos de la seguridad global están siendo amenazados. Estas tendencias son peligrosas, pero no inevitables.

Los retos venideros
La elección es nuestra: formar una sociedad global para cuidar la Tierra y cuidarnos unos a otros o arriesgarnos a la destrucción de nosotros mismos y de la diversidad de la vida. Se necesitan cambios fundamentales en nuestros valores, instituciones y formas de vida. Debemos darnos cuenta de que, una vez satisfechas las necesidades básicas, el desarrollo humano se refiere primordialmente a ser más, no a tener más. Poseemos el conocimiento y la tecnología necesarios para proveer a todos y para reducir nuestros impactos sobre el medio ambiente. El surgimiento de una sociedad civil global, está creando nuevas oportunidades para construir un mundo democrático y humanitario. Nuestros retos ambientales, económicos, políticos, sociales y espirituales, están interrelacionados y juntos podemos proponer y concretar soluciones comprensivas.

Responsabilidad Universal
Para llevar a cabo estas aspiraciones, debemos tomar la decisión de vivir de acuerdo con un sentido de responsabilidad universal, identificándonos con toda la comunidad terrestre, al igual que con nuestras comunidades locales. Somos ciudadanos de diferentes naciones y de un solo mundo al mismo tiempo, en donde los ámbitos local y global, se encuentran estrechamente vinculados. Todos compartimos una responsabilidad hacia el bienestar presente y futuro de la familia humana y del mundo viviente en su amplitud. El espíritu de solidaridad humana y de afinidad con toda la vida se fortalece cuando vivimos con reverencia ante el misterio del ser, con gratitud por el regalo de la vida y con humildad con respecto al lugar que ocupa el ser humano en la naturaleza.

Necesitamos urgentemente una visión compartida sobre los valores básicos que brinden un fundamento ético para la comunidad mundial emergente. Por lo tanto, juntos y con una gran esperanza, afirmamos los siguientes principios interdependientes, para una forma de vida sostenible, como un fundamento común mediante el cual se deberá guiar y valorar la conducta de las personas, organizaciones, empresas, gobiernos e instituciones transnacionales.

PRINCIPIOS
I. Respeto y Cuidado de la Comunidad de la Vida
  1. Respetar la Tierra y la vida en toda su diversidad
    1. Reconocer que todos los seres son interdependientes y que toda forma de vida tiene valor, independientemente de su utilidad para los seres humanos.
    2. Afirmar la fe en la dignidad inherente a todos los seres humanos y en el potencial intelectual, artístico, ético y espiritual de la humanidad.
  2. Cuidar la comunidad de la vida con entendimiento, compasión y amor.
    1. Aceptar que el derecho a poseer, administrar y utilizar los recursos naturales conduce hacia el deber de prevenir daños ambientales y proteger los derechos de las personas.
    2. Afirmar, que a mayor libertad, conocimiento y poder, se presenta una correspondiente responsabilidad por promover el bien común.
  3. Construir sociedades democráticas que sean justas, participativas, sostenibles y pacíficas
    1. Asegurar que las comunidades, a todo nivel, garanticen los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales y brinden a todos la oportunidad de desarrollar su pleno potencial.
    2. Promover la justicia social y económica, posibilitando que todos alcancen un modo de vida seguro y digno, pero ecológicamente responsable.
  4. Asegurar que los frutos y la belleza de la Tierra se preserven para las generaciones presentes y futuras.
    1. Reconocer que la libertad de acción de cada generación se encuentra condicionada por las necesidades de las generaciones futuras.
    2. Transmitir a las futuras generaciones valores, tradiciones e instituciones, que apoyen la prosperidad a largo plazo, de las comunidades humanas y ecológicas de la Tierra.
Para poder realizar estos cuatro compromisos generales, es necesario:

II. Integridad Ecológica
  1. Proteger y restaurar la integridad de los sistemas ecológicos de la Tierra, con especial preocupación por la diversidad biológica y los procesos naturales que sustentan la vida.
    1. Adoptar, a todo nivel, planes de desarrollo sostenible y regulaciones que permitan incluir la conservación y la rehabilitación ambientales, como parte integral de todas las iniciativas de desarrollo.
    2. Establecer y salvaguardar reservas viables para la naturaleza y la biosfera, incluyendo tierras silvestres y áreas marinas, de modo que tiendan a proteger los sistemas de soporte a la vida de la Tierra, para mantener la biodiversidad y preservar nuestra herencia natural.
    3. Promover la recuperación de especies y ecosistemas en peligro.
    4. Controlar y erradicar los organismos exógenos o genéticamente modificados, que sean dañinos para las especies autóctonas y el medio ambiente; y además, prevenir la introducción de tales organismos dañinos.
    5. Manejar el uso de recursos renovables como el agua, la tierra, los productos forestales y la vida marina, de manera que no se excedan las posibilidades de regeneración y se proteja la salud de los ecosistemas.
    6. Manejar la extracción y el uso de los recursos no renovables, tales como minerales y combustibles fósiles, de forma que se minimice su agotamiento y no se causen serios daños ambientales.
  2. Evitar dañar como el mejor método de protección ambiental y cuando el conocimiento sea limitado, proceder con precaución.
    1. Tomar medidas para evitar la posibilidad de daños ambientales graves o irreversibles, aun cuando el conocimiento científico sea incompleto o inconcluso.
    2. Imponer las pruebas respectivas y hacer que las partes responsables asuman las consecuencias de reparar el daño ambiental, principalmente para quienes argumenten que una actividad propuesta no causará ningún daño significativo.
    3. Asegurar que la toma de decisiones contemple las consecuencias acumulativas, a largo término, indirectas, de larga distancia y globales de las actividades humanas.
    4. Prevenir la contaminación de cualquier parte del medio ambiente y no permitir la acumulación de sustancias radioactivas, tóxicas u otras sustancias peligrosas.
    5. Evitar actividades militares que dañen el medio ambiente.
  3. Adoptar patrones de producción, consumo y reproducción que salvaguarden las capacidades regenerativas de la Tierra, los derechos humanos y el bienestar comunitario.
    1. Reducir, reutilizar y reciclar los materiales usados en los sistemas de producción y consumo y asegurar que los desechos residuales puedan ser asimilados por los sistemas ecológicos.
    2. Actuar con moderación y eficiencia al utilizar energía y tratar de depender cada vez más de los recursos de energía renovables, tales como la solar y eólica.
    3. Promover el desarrollo, la adopción y la transferencia equitativa de tecnologías ambientalmente sanas.
    4. Internalizar los costos ambientales y sociales totales de bienes y servicios en su precio de venta y posibilitar que los consumidores puedan identificar productos que cumplan con las más altas normas sociales y ambientales.
    5. Asegurar el acceso universal al cuidado de la salud que fomente la salud reproductiva y la reproducción responsable.
    6. Adoptar formas de vida que pongan énfasis en la calidad de vida y en la suficiencia material en un mundo finito.
  4. Impulsar el estudio de la sostenibilidad ecológica y promover el intercambio abierto y la extensa aplicación del conocimiento adquirido
    1. Apoyar la cooperación internacional científica y técnica sobre sostenibilidad, con especial atención a las necesidades de las naciones en desarrollo.
    2. Reconocer y preservar el conocimiento tradicional y la sabiduría espiritual en todas las culturas que contribuyen a la protección ambiental y al bienestar humano.
    3. Asegurar que la información de vital importancia para la salud humana y la protección ambiental, incluyendo la información genética, esté disponible en el dominio público.
III. Justicia Social y Económica
  1. Erradicar la pobreza como un imperativo ético, social y ambiental
    1. Garantizar el derecho al agua potable, al aire limpio, a la seguridad alimenticia, a la tierra no contaminada, a una vivienda y a un saneamiento seguro, asignando los recursos nacionales e internacionales requeridos.
    2. Habilitar a todos los seres humanos con la educación y con los recursos requeridos para que alcancen un modo de vida sostenible y proveer la seguridad social y las redes de apoyo requeridos para quienes no puedan mantenerse por sí mismos.
    3. Reconocer a los ignorados, proteger a los vulnerables, servir a aquellos que sufren y posibilitar el desarrollo de sus capacidades y perseguir sus aspiraciones.
  2. Asegurar que las actividades e instituciones económicas, a todo nivel, promuevan el desarrollo humano de forma equitativa y sostenible.
    1. Promover la distribución equitativa de la riqueza dentro de las naciones y entre ellas.
    2. Intensificar los recursos intelectuales, financieros, técnicos y sociales de las naciones en desarrollo y liberarlas de onerosas deudas internacionales.
    3. Asegurar que todo comercio apoye el uso sostenible de los recursos, la protección ambiental y las normas laborales progresivas.
    4. Involucrar e informar a las corporaciones multinacionales y a los organismos financieros internacionales para que actúen transparentemente por el bien público y exigirles responsabilidad por las consecuencias de sus actividades.
  3. Afirmar la igualdad y equidad de género como prerrequisitos para el desarrollo sostenible y asegurar el acceso universal a la educación, el cuidado de la salud y la oportunidad económica.
    1. Asegurar los derechos humanos de las mujeres y las niñas y terminar con toda la violencia contra ellas.
    2. Promover la participación activa de las mujeres en todos los aspectos de la vida económica, política, cívica, social y cultural, como socias plenas e iguales en la toma de decisiones, como líderes y como beneficiarias.
    3. Fortalecer las familias y garantizar la seguridad y la crianza amorosa de todos sus miembros.
  4. Defender el derecho de todos, sin discriminación, a un entorno natural y social que apoye la dignidad humana, la salud física y el bienestar espiritual, con especial atención a los derechos de los pueblos indígenas y las minorías.
    1. Eliminar la discriminación en todas sus formas, tales como aquellas basadas en la raza, el color, el género, la orientación sexual, la religión, el idioma y el origen nacional, étnico o social.
    2. Afirmar el derecho de los pueblos indígenas a su espiritualidad, conocimientos, tierras y recursos y a sus prácticas vinculadas a un modo de vida sostenible.
    3. Honrar y apoyar a los jóvenes de nuestras comunidades, habilitándolos para que ejerzan su papel esencial en la creación de sociedades sostenibles.
    4. Proteger y restaurar lugares de importancia que tengan un significado cultural y espiritual.
IV. Democracia, No Violencia y Paz
  1. Fortalecer las instituciones democráticas en todos los niveles y brindar transparencia y rendimiento de cuentas en la gobernabilidad, participación inclusiva en la toma de decisiones y acceso a la justicia
    1. Sostener el derecho de todos a recibir información clara y oportuna sobre asuntos ambientales, al igual que sobre todos los planes y actividades de desarrollo que los pueda afectar o en los que tengan interés.
    2. Apoyar la sociedad civil local, regional y global y promover la participación significativa de todos los individuos y organizaciones interesados en la toma de decisiones.
    3. Proteger los derechos a la libertad de opinión, expresión, reunión pacífica, asociación y disensión.
    4. Instituir el acceso efectivo y eficiente de procedimientos administrativos y judiciales independientes, incluyendo las soluciones y compensaciones por daños ambientales y por la amenaza de tales daños.
    5. Eliminar la corrupción en todas las instituciones públicas y privadas.
    6. Fortalecer las comunidades locales, habilitándolas para que puedan cuidar sus propios ambientes y asignar la responsabilidad ambiental en aquellos niveles de gobierno en donde puedan llevarse a cabo de manera más efectiva.
  2. Integrar en la educación formal y en el aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida, las habilidades, el conocimiento y los valores necesarios para un modo de vida sostenible.
    1. Brindar a todos, especialmente a los niños y los jóvenes, oportunidades educativas que les capaciten para contribuir activamente al desarrollo sostenible.
    2. Promover la contribución de las artes y de las humanidades, al igual que de las ciencias, para la educación sobre la sostenibilidad.
    3. Intensificar el papel de los medios masivos de comunicación en la toma de conciencia sobre los retos ecológicos y sociales.
    4. Reconocer la importancia de la educación moral y espiritual para una vida sostenible.
  3. Tratar a todos los seres vivientes con respeto y consideración
    1. Prevenir la crueldad contra los animales que se mantengan en las sociedades humanas y protegerlos del sufrimiento.
    2. Proteger a los animales salvajes de métodos de caza, trampa y pesca, que les causen un sufrimiento extremo, prolongado o evitable.
    3. Evitar o eliminar, hasta donde sea posible, la toma o destrucción de especies por simple diversión, negligencia o desconocimiento.
  4. Promover una cultura de tolerancia, no violencia y paz.
    1. Alentar y apoyar la comprensión mutua, la solidaridad y la cooperación entre todos los pueblos tanto dentro como entre las naciones.
    2. Implementar estrategias amplias y comprensivas para prevenir los conflictos violentos y utilizar la colaboración en la resolución de problemas para gestionar y resolver conflictos ambientales y otras disputas.
    3. Desmilitarizar los sistemas nacionales de seguridad al nivel de una postura de defensa no provocativa y emplear los recursos militares para fines pacíficos, incluyendo la restauración ecológica.
    4. Eliminar las armas nucleares, biológicas y tóxicas y otras armas de destrucción masiva.
    5. Asegurar que el uso del espacio orbital y exterior apoye y se comprometa con la protección ambiental y la paz.
    6. Reconocer que la paz es la integridad creada por relaciones correctas con uno mismo, otras personas, otras culturas, otras formas de vida, la Tierra y con el todo más grande, del cual somos parte.
EL CAMINO HACIA ADELANTE
Como nunca antes en la historia, el destino común nos hace un llamado a buscar un nuevo comienzo. Tal renovación es la promesa de estos principios de la Carta de la Tierra. Para cumplir esta promesa, debemos comprometernos a adoptar y promover los valores y objetivos en ella expuestos.

El proceso requerirá un cambio de mentalidad y de corazón; requiere también de un nuevo sentido de interdependencia global y responsabilidad universal. Debemos desarrollar y aplicar imaginativamente la visión de un modo de vida sostenible a nivel local, nacional, regional y global. Nuestra diversidad cultural es una herencia preciosa y las diferentes culturas encontrarán sus propias formas para concretar lo establecido. Debemos profundizar y ampliar el diálogo global que generó la Carta de la Tierra, puesto que tenemos mucho que aprender en la búsqueda colaboradora de la verdad y la sabiduría.

La vida a menudo conduce a tensiones entre valores importantes. Ello puede implicar decisiones difíciles; sin embargo, se debe buscar la manera de armonizar la diversidad con la unidad; el ejercicio de la libertad con el bien común; los objetivos de corto plazo con las metas a largo plazo. Todo individuo, familia, organización y comunidad, tiene un papel vital que cumplir. Las artes, las ciencias, las religiones, las instituciones educativas, los medios de comunicación, las empresas, las organizaciones no gubernamentales y los gobiernos, están llamados a ofrecer un liderazgo creativo. La alianza entre gobiernos, sociedad civil y empresas, es esencial para la gobernabilidad efectiva.

Con el objeto de construir una comunidad global sostenible, las naciones del mundo deben renovar su compromiso con las Naciones Unidas, cumplir con sus obligaciones bajo los acuerdos internacionales existentes y apoyar la implementación de los principios de la Carta de la Tierra, por medio de un instrumento internacional legalmente vinculante sobre medio ambiente y desarrollo.

Que el nuestro sea un tiempo que se recuerde por el despertar de una nueva reverencia ante la vida; por la firme resolución de alcanzar la sostenibilidad; por el aceleramiento en la lucha por la justicia y la paz y por la alegre celebración de la vida.



Programas Educativos
28 de mayo - 19 de noviembre 2019
Diplomado en Educación para el Desarrollo Sostenible 2019

Programa Internacional de
 
Registrado
26 Ago 2013
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24.277
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La Agenda de la ONU, mediante la cual se pretende destruir al Cristianismo=Dios Creador, hace décadas que lleva fraguándose.



¿QUÉ ES LA CARTA DE LA TIERRA?
La Carta de la Tierra es una declaración de principios éticos fundamentales para la construcción de una sociedad global justa, sostenible y pacífica en el Siglo XXI. La Carta busca inspirar en todas las personas un nuevo sentido de interdependencia global y de responsabilidad compartida para el bienestar de toda la familia humana, de la gran comunidad de vida y de las futuras generaciones. La Carta es una visión de esperanza y un llamado a la acción.

La Carta de la Tierra
Estamos en un momento crítico de la historia de la Tierra, en el cual la humanidad debe elegir su futuro. A medida que el mundo se vuelve cada vez más interdependiente y frágil, el futuro depara, a la vez, grandes riesgos y grandes promesas. Para seguir adelante, debemos reconocer que, en medio de la magnífica diversidad de culturas y formas de vida, somos una sola familia humana y una sola comunidad terrestre con un destino común. Debemos unirnos para crear una sociedad global sostenible fundada en el respeto hacia la naturaleza, los derechos humanos universales, la justicia económica y una cultura de paz. En torno a este fin, es imperativo que nosotros, los pueblos de la Tierra, declaremos nuestra responsabilidad unos hacia otros, hacia la gran comunidad de la vida y hacia las generaciones futuras.

La Tierra, nuestro hogar
La humanidad es parte de un vasto universo evolutivo. La Tierra, nuestro hogar, está viva con una comunidad singular de vida. Las fuerzas de la naturaleza promueven a que la existencia sea una aventura exigente e incierta, pero la Tierra ha brindado las condiciones esenciales para la evolución de la vida. La capacidad de recuperación de la comunidad de vida y el bienestar de la humanidad dependen de la preservación de una biosfera saludable, con todos sus sistemas ecológicos, una rica variedad de plantas y animales, tierras fértiles, aguas puras y aire limpio. El medio ambiente global, con sus recursos finitos, es una preocupación común para todos los pueblos. La protección de la vitalidad, la diversidad y la belleza de la Tierra es un deber sagrado.

La situación global
Los patrones dominantes de producción y consumo están causando devastación ambiental, agotamiento de recursos y una extinción masiva de especies. Las comunidades están siendo destruidas. Los beneficios del desarrollo no se comparten equitativamente y la brecha entre ricos y pobres se está ensanchando. La injusticia, la pobreza, la ignorancia y los conflictos violentos se manifiestan por doquier y son la causa de grandes sufrimientos. Un aumento sin precedentes de la población humana ha sobrecargado los sistemas ecológicos y sociales. Los fundamentos de la seguridad global están siendo amenazados. Estas tendencias son peligrosas, pero no inevitables.

Los retos venideros
La elección es nuestra: formar una sociedad global para cuidar la Tierra y cuidarnos unos a otros o arriesgarnos a la destrucción de nosotros mismos y de la diversidad de la vida. Se necesitan cambios fundamentales en nuestros valores, instituciones y formas de vida. Debemos darnos cuenta de que, una vez satisfechas las necesidades básicas, el desarrollo humano se refiere primordialmente a ser más, no a tener más. Poseemos el conocimiento y la tecnología necesarios para proveer a todos y para reducir nuestros impactos sobre el medio ambiente. El surgimiento de una sociedad civil global, está creando nuevas oportunidades para construir un mundo democrático y humanitario. Nuestros retos ambientales, económicos, políticos, sociales y espirituales, están interrelacionados y juntos podemos proponer y concretar soluciones comprensivas.

Responsabilidad Universal
Para llevar a cabo estas aspiraciones, debemos tomar la decisión de vivir de acuerdo con un sentido de responsabilidad universal, identificándonos con toda la comunidad terrestre, al igual que con nuestras comunidades locales. Somos ciudadanos de diferentes naciones y de un solo mundo al mismo tiempo, en donde los ámbitos local y global, se encuentran estrechamente vinculados. Todos compartimos una responsabilidad hacia el bienestar presente y futuro de la familia humana y del mundo viviente en su amplitud. El espíritu de solidaridad humana y de afinidad con toda la vida se fortalece cuando vivimos con reverencia ante el misterio del ser, con gratitud por el regalo de la vida y con humildad con respecto al lugar que ocupa el ser humano en la naturaleza.

Necesitamos urgentemente una visión compartida sobre los valores básicos que brinden un fundamento ético para la comunidad mundial emergente. Por lo tanto, juntos y con una gran esperanza, afirmamos los siguientes principios interdependientes, para una forma de vida sostenible, como un fundamento común mediante el cual se deberá guiar y valorar la conducta de las personas, organizaciones, empresas, gobiernos e instituciones transnacionales.

PRINCIPIOS
I. Respeto y Cuidado de la Comunidad de la Vida
  1. Respetar la Tierra y la vida en toda su diversidad
    1. Reconocer que todos los seres son interdependientes y que toda forma de vida tiene valor, independientemente de su utilidad para los seres humanos.
    2. Afirmar la fe en la dignidad inherente a todos los seres humanos y en el potencial intelectual, artístico, ético y espiritual de la humanidad.
  2. Cuidar la comunidad de la vida con entendimiento, compasión y amor.
    1. Aceptar que el derecho a poseer, administrar y utilizar los recursos naturales conduce hacia el deber de prevenir daños ambientales y proteger los derechos de las personas.
    2. Afirmar, que a mayor libertad, conocimiento y poder, se presenta una correspondiente responsabilidad por promover el bien común.
  3. Construir sociedades democráticas que sean justas, participativas, sostenibles y pacíficas
    1. Asegurar que las comunidades, a todo nivel, garanticen los derechos humanos y las libertades fundamentales y brinden a todos la oportunidad de desarrollar su pleno potencial.
    2. Promover la justicia social y económica, posibilitando que todos alcancen un modo de vida seguro y digno, pero ecológicamente responsable.
  4. Asegurar que los frutos y la belleza de la Tierra se preserven para las generaciones presentes y futuras.
    1. Reconocer que la libertad de acción de cada generación se encuentra condicionada por las necesidades de las generaciones futuras.
    2. Transmitir a las futuras generaciones valores, tradiciones e instituciones, que apoyen la prosperidad a largo plazo, de las comunidades humanas y ecológicas de la Tierra.
Para poder realizar estos cuatro compromisos generales, es necesario:

II. Integridad Ecológica
  1. Proteger y restaurar la integridad de los sistemas ecológicos de la Tierra, con especial preocupación por la diversidad biológica y los procesos naturales que sustentan la vida.
    1. Adoptar, a todo nivel, planes de desarrollo sostenible y regulaciones que permitan incluir la conservación y la rehabilitación ambientales, como parte integral de todas las iniciativas de desarrollo.
    2. Establecer y salvaguardar reservas viables para la naturaleza y la biosfera, incluyendo tierras silvestres y áreas marinas, de modo que tiendan a proteger los sistemas de soporte a la vida de la Tierra, para mantener la biodiversidad y preservar nuestra herencia natural.
    3. Promover la recuperación de especies y ecosistemas en peligro.
    4. Controlar y erradicar los organismos exógenos o genéticamente modificados, que sean dañinos para las especies autóctonas y el medio ambiente; y además, prevenir la introducción de tales organismos dañinos.
    5. Manejar el uso de recursos renovables como el agua, la tierra, los productos forestales y la vida marina, de manera que no se excedan las posibilidades de regeneración y se proteja la salud de los ecosistemas.
    6. Manejar la extracción y el uso de los recursos no renovables, tales como minerales y combustibles fósiles, de forma que se minimice su agotamiento y no se causen serios daños ambientales.
  2. Evitar dañar como el mejor método de protección ambiental y cuando el conocimiento sea limitado, proceder con precaución.
    1. Tomar medidas para evitar la posibilidad de daños ambientales graves o irreversibles, aun cuando el conocimiento científico sea incompleto o inconcluso.
    2. Imponer las pruebas respectivas y hacer que las partes responsables asuman las consecuencias de reparar el daño ambiental, principalmente para quienes argumenten que una actividad propuesta no causará ningún daño significativo.
    3. Asegurar que la toma de decisiones contemple las consecuencias acumulativas, a largo término, indirectas, de larga distancia y globales de las actividades humanas.
    4. Prevenir la contaminación de cualquier parte del medio ambiente y no permitir la acumulación de sustancias radioactivas, tóxicas u otras sustancias peligrosas.
    5. Evitar actividades militares que dañen el medio ambiente.
  3. Adoptar patrones de producción, consumo y reproducción que salvaguarden las capacidades regenerativas de la Tierra, los derechos humanos y el bienestar comunitario.
    1. Reducir, reutilizar y reciclar los materiales usados en los sistemas de producción y consumo y asegurar que los desechos residuales puedan ser asimilados por los sistemas ecológicos.
    2. Actuar con moderación y eficiencia al utilizar energía y tratar de depender cada vez más de los recursos de energía renovables, tales como la solar y eólica.
    3. Promover el desarrollo, la adopción y la transferencia equitativa de tecnologías ambientalmente sanas.
    4. Internalizar los costos ambientales y sociales totales de bienes y servicios en su precio de venta y posibilitar que los consumidores puedan identificar productos que cumplan con las más altas normas sociales y ambientales.
    5. Asegurar el acceso universal al cuidado de la salud que fomente la salud reproductiva y la reproducción responsable.
    6. Adoptar formas de vida que pongan énfasis en la calidad de vida y en la suficiencia material en un mundo finito.
  4. Impulsar el estudio de la sostenibilidad ecológica y promover el intercambio abierto y la extensa aplicación del conocimiento adquirido
    1. Apoyar la cooperación internacional científica y técnica sobre sostenibilidad, con especial atención a las necesidades de las naciones en desarrollo.
    2. Reconocer y preservar el conocimiento tradicional y la sabiduría espiritual en todas las culturas que contribuyen a la protección ambiental y al bienestar humano.
    3. Asegurar que la información de vital importancia para la salud humana y la protección ambiental, incluyendo la información genética, esté disponible en el dominio público.
III. Justicia Social y Económica
  1. Erradicar la pobreza como un imperativo ético, social y ambiental
    1. Garantizar el derecho al agua potable, al aire limpio, a la seguridad alimenticia, a la tierra no contaminada, a una vivienda y a un saneamiento seguro, asignando los recursos nacionales e internacionales requeridos.
    2. Habilitar a todos los seres humanos con la educación y con los recursos requeridos para que alcancen un modo de vida sostenible y proveer la seguridad social y las redes de apoyo requeridos para quienes no puedan mantenerse por sí mismos.
    3. Reconocer a los ignorados, proteger a los vulnerables, servir a aquellos que sufren y posibilitar el desarrollo de sus capacidades y perseguir sus aspiraciones.
  2. Asegurar que las actividades e instituciones económicas, a todo nivel, promuevan el desarrollo humano de forma equitativa y sostenible.
    1. Promover la distribución equitativa de la riqueza dentro de las naciones y entre ellas.
    2. Intensificar los recursos intelectuales, financieros, técnicos y sociales de las naciones en desarrollo y liberarlas de onerosas deudas internacionales.
    3. Asegurar que todo comercio apoye el uso sostenible de los recursos, la protección ambiental y las normas laborales progresivas.
    4. Involucrar e informar a las corporaciones multinacionales y a los organismos financieros internacionales para que actúen transparentemente por el bien público y exigirles responsabilidad por las consecuencias de sus actividades.
  3. Afirmar la igualdad y equidad de género como prerrequisitos para el desarrollo sostenible y asegurar el acceso universal a la educación, el cuidado de la salud y la oportunidad económica.
    1. Asegurar los derechos humanos de las mujeres y las niñas y terminar con toda la violencia contra ellas.
    2. Promover la participación activa de las mujeres en todos los aspectos de la vida económica, política, cívica, social y cultural, como socias plenas e iguales en la toma de decisiones, como líderes y como beneficiarias.
    3. Fortalecer las familias y garantizar la seguridad y la crianza amorosa de todos sus miembros.
  4. Defender el derecho de todos, sin discriminación, a un entorno natural y social que apoye la dignidad humana, la salud física y el bienestar espiritual, con especial atención a los derechos de los pueblos indígenas y las minorías.
    1. Eliminar la discriminación en todas sus formas, tales como aquellas basadas en la raza, el color, el género, la orientación sexual, la religión, el idioma y el origen nacional, étnico o social.
    2. Afirmar el derecho de los pueblos indígenas a su espiritualidad, conocimientos, tierras y recursos y a sus prácticas vinculadas a un modo de vida sostenible.
    3. Honrar y apoyar a los jóvenes de nuestras comunidades, habilitándolos para que ejerzan su papel esencial en la creación de sociedades sostenibles.
    4. Proteger y restaurar lugares de importancia que tengan un significado cultural y espiritual.
IV. Democracia, No Violencia y Paz
  1. Fortalecer las instituciones democráticas en todos los niveles y brindar transparencia y rendimiento de cuentas en la gobernabilidad, participación inclusiva en la toma de decisiones y acceso a la justicia
    1. Sostener el derecho de todos a recibir información clara y oportuna sobre asuntos ambientales, al igual que sobre todos los planes y actividades de desarrollo que los pueda afectar o en los que tengan interés.
    2. Apoyar la sociedad civil local, regional y global y promover la participación significativa de todos los individuos y organizaciones interesados en la toma de decisiones.
    3. Proteger los derechos a la libertad de opinión, expresión, reunión pacífica, asociación y disensión.
    4. Instituir el acceso efectivo y eficiente de procedimientos administrativos y judiciales independientes, incluyendo las soluciones y compensaciones por daños ambientales y por la amenaza de tales daños.
    5. Eliminar la corrupción en todas las instituciones públicas y privadas.
    6. Fortalecer las comunidades locales, habilitándolas para que puedan cuidar sus propios ambientes y asignar la responsabilidad ambiental en aquellos niveles de gobierno en donde puedan llevarse a cabo de manera más efectiva.
  2. Integrar en la educación formal y en el aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida, las habilidades, el conocimiento y los valores necesarios para un modo de vida sostenible.
    1. Brindar a todos, especialmente a los niños y los jóvenes, oportunidades educativas que les capaciten para contribuir activamente al desarrollo sostenible.
    2. Promover la contribución de las artes y de las humanidades, al igual que de las ciencias, para la educación sobre la sostenibilidad.
    3. Intensificar el papel de los medios masivos de comunicación en la toma de conciencia sobre los retos ecológicos y sociales.
    4. Reconocer la importancia de la educación moral y espiritual para una vida sostenible.
  3. Tratar a todos los seres vivientes con respeto y consideración
    1. Prevenir la crueldad contra los animales que se mantengan en las sociedades humanas y protegerlos del sufrimiento.
    2. Proteger a los animales salvajes de métodos de caza, trampa y pesca, que les causen un sufrimiento extremo, prolongado o evitable.
    3. Evitar o eliminar, hasta donde sea posible, la toma o destrucción de especies por simple diversión, negligencia o desconocimiento.
  4. Promover una cultura de tolerancia, no violencia y paz.
    1. Alentar y apoyar la comprensión mutua, la solidaridad y la cooperación entre todos los pueblos tanto dentro como entre las naciones.
    2. Implementar estrategias amplias y comprensivas para prevenir los conflictos violentos y utilizar la colaboración en la resolución de problemas para gestionar y resolver conflictos ambientales y otras disputas.
    3. Desmilitarizar los sistemas nacionales de seguridad al nivel de una postura de defensa no provocativa y emplear los recursos militares para fines pacíficos, incluyendo la restauración ecológica.
    4. Eliminar las armas nucleares, biológicas y tóxicas y otras armas de destrucción masiva.
    5. Asegurar que el uso del espacio orbital y exterior apoye y se comprometa con la protección ambiental y la paz.
    6. Reconocer que la paz es la integridad creada por relaciones correctas con uno mismo, otras personas, otras culturas, otras formas de vida, la Tierra y con el todo más grande, del cual somos parte.
EL CAMINO HACIA ADELANTE
Como nunca antes en la historia, el destino común nos hace un llamado a buscar un nuevo comienzo. Tal renovación es la promesa de estos principios de la Carta de la Tierra. Para cumplir esta promesa, debemos comprometernos a adoptar y promover los valores y objetivos en ella expuestos.

El proceso requerirá un cambio de mentalidad y de corazón; requiere también de un nuevo sentido de interdependencia global y responsabilidad universal. Debemos desarrollar y aplicar imaginativamente la visión de un modo de vida sostenible a nivel local, nacional, regional y global. Nuestra diversidad cultural es una herencia preciosa y las diferentes culturas encontrarán sus propias formas para concretar lo establecido. Debemos profundizar y ampliar el diálogo global que generó la Carta de la Tierra, puesto que tenemos mucho que aprender en la búsqueda colaboradora de la verdad y la sabiduría.

La vida a menudo conduce a tensiones entre valores importantes. Ello puede implicar decisiones difíciles; sin embargo, se debe buscar la manera de armonizar la diversidad con la unidad; el ejercicio de la libertad con el bien común; los objetivos de corto plazo con las metas a largo plazo. Todo individuo, familia, organización y comunidad, tiene un papel vital que cumplir. Las artes, las ciencias, las religiones, las instituciones educativas, los medios de comunicación, las empresas, las organizaciones no gubernamentales y los gobiernos, están llamados a ofrecer un liderazgo creativo. La alianza entre gobiernos, sociedad civil y empresas, es esencial para la gobernabilidad efectiva.

Con el objeto de construir una comunidad global sostenible, las naciones del mundo deben renovar su compromiso con las Naciones Unidas, cumplir con sus obligaciones bajo los acuerdos internacionales existentes y apoyar la implementación de los principios de la Carta de la Tierra, por medio de un instrumento internacional legalmente vinculante sobre medio ambiente y desarrollo.

Que el nuestro sea un tiempo que se recuerde por el despertar de una nueva reverencia ante la vida; por la firme resolución de alcanzar la sostenibilidad; por el aceleramiento en la lucha por la justicia y la paz y por la alegre celebración de la vida.



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28 de mayo - 19 de noviembre 2019
Diplomado en Educación para el Desarrollo Sostenible 2019

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De mal en peor. Un relator de la ONU carga las tintas y dice que la humanidad se enfrenta a un “apartheid climático”
“El cambio climático amenaza con deshacer el progreso de los últimos 50 años (...) en la reducción de pobreza”, asegura Philip Alston.
Andrés Velázquez 26/06/19 14:10


Philip Aslton

La humanidad se enfrenta a un “apartheid climático”, con una pequeña parte rica que puede adaptarse mejor al calentamiento global y la otra -con menos recursos económicos y peores infraestructuras y servicios- obligada a soportar los efectos de la crisis climática, curiosamente provocada mayoritariamente por los países ricos, recoge El Periódico.

Las conclusiones del informe del relator especial de la ONU sobre la pobreza extrema y derechos humanos, Philip Alston, no deja lugar a dudas sobre la gravedad de la crisis climática y sus efectos desiguales en la población mundial.

“El cambio climático amenaza con deshacer el progreso de los últimos 50 años (...) en la reducción de pobreza”, “los derechos humanos podrían no sobrevivir a la agitación que se avecina”, indica el documento elaborado por Philip Alston, que debe ser presentado oficialmente el viernes 28 de junio ante el Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU en Ginebra.

El informe critica duramente el gobierno de Donald Trump por “silenciar activamente” la ciencia del clima y critica al presidente brasileño, Jair Bolsonaro, por su promesa de abrir la selva amazónica a la minería. En los apartados positivos del informe Alston, apunta las acciones legales contra estados y compañías de combustibles fósiles, el activismo ambientalista desatado al entorno de Greta Thunberg y las huelgas escolares en todo el mundo, y el movimiento Extinction Rebellion.

El informe predice que la crisis climática puede dejar a 140 millones de personas sin hogar en los países en desarrollo en el horizonte de 2050


El informe predice que la crisis climática puede dejar a 140 millones de personas sin hogar en los países en desarrollo en el horizonte de 2050.

”De manera perversa, mientras que los pobres son responsables de solo una fracción de las emisiones globales, son los que pagarán el precio del cambio climático y tendrán la menor capacidad para protegerse”, indica Alston en un comunicado de prensa previo a la presentación del informe oficial.

El informe recuerda que a pesar de las repetidas advertencias sobre las amenazas planteadas por el cambio climático, este problema sigue siendo “una preocupación marginal”. En especial, Alston recuerda que la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos no ha ofrecido de momento suficiente atención y recursos a la crisis climática.

”Mientras que una verdadera crisis que amenaza los derechos humanos de una gran cantidad de personas nos está golpeando, la metodología usual de derechos humanos que aborda la cuestión por cuestión, poco a poco, es terriblemente inadecuada”, concluye el comisionado especial.